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Mol Nutr Food Res. 2019 Jul 4:e1900249. doi: 10.1002/mnfr.201900249. [Epub ahead of print]

Diet Consisting of Balanced Yogurt, Fruit and Vegetables Modifies the Gut Microbiota and Protects Mice Against Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

Kong CY1,2, Li ZM1,2, Han B1,2, Zhang ZY1,2, Chen HL1,2, Zhang SL1,2, Xu JQ1,2, Mao YQ1,2, Zhao YP1,2, Wang LS1,2.

Author information

1
C.-Y. Kong, Z.-M. Li, B. Han, Z.-Y. Zhang, H.-L. Chen, S.-L. Zhang, J.-Q. Xu, Y.-Q. Mao, Y.-P. Zhao, L.-S. Wang, Minhang Hospital, Fudan University, 201199, Shanghai, China.
2
C.-Y. Kong, Z.-M. Li, B. Han, Z.-Y. Zhang, H.-L. Chen, S.-L. Zhang, J.-Q. Xu, Y.-Q. Mao, Y.-P. Zhao, L.-S. Wang, Institute of Fudan-Minhang Academic Health System, Minhang Hospital, Fudan University, 201199, Shanghai, China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Calorie restriction (CR) is a therapeutically effective method for the NAFLD. However, the compliance of the CR method is relatively poor. New CR methods are needed.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Each week, mice were given a 5-day high-fat diet (HFD) ad libitum plus a two days of intermittent calorie restriction (ICR) diet (50% calorie restriction) consisting of yogurt, fruit and vegetables, for 16 weeks. The effect of the ICR diet model on fatty liver of mice was examined. Compared with continuous HFD-fed mice, the mice feeding HFD+ICR had lower body weight and hepatic steatosis, reduced serum lipid and transaminase levels, increased fatty acid oxidation gene of Cpt1a and decreased hepatic lipid synthesis gene of PparĪ³ and Srebf-1c, as well as improved insulin resistance and lower level of inflammation. Moreover, ICR reversed the dysbacteriosis in HFD group, including the lower Shannon diversity indexes and lower abundance of Lactobacillus.

CONCLUSIONS:

ICR diet consisting of yogurt, fruit and vegetables attenuates the development of HFD-induced hepatic steatosis in mice. Furthermore, HFD+ICR diet is associated with a different fecal microbiota that tends to be more similar to ND controls. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

NAFLD; gut microbiota; high-fat diet; inflammation; intermittent calorie restriction

PMID:
31271251
DOI:
10.1002/mnfr.201900249

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