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J Clin Med. 2019 Jul 2;8(7). pii: E960. doi: 10.3390/jcm8070960.

Effects of a Lifestyle Intervention in Routine Care on Prenatal Dietary Behavior-Findings from the Cluster-Randomized GeliS Trial.

Author information

1
Else Kröner-Fresenius-Centre for Nutritional Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Georg-Brauchle-Ring 62, Munich 80992, Bavaria, Germany.
2
Competence Centre for Nutrition (KErn), Am Gereuth 4, Freising 85354, Bavaria, Germany.
3
Else Kröner-Fresenius-Centre for Nutritional Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Georg-Brauchle-Ring 62, Munich 80992, Bavaria, Germany. hans.hauner@tum.de.

Abstract

The antenatal lifestyle and excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) modify the risk of obstetric complications, maternal weight retention, and the risk of obesity for the next generation. The cluster-randomized controlled "Healthy living in pregnancy" (GeliS) study, recruiting 2286 women, was designed to examine whether a lifestyle intervention reduced the proportion of women with excessive GWG. Trained healthcare providers gave four counseling sessions covering a healthy diet, regular physical activity, and self-monitoring of GWG in the intervention group. In this secondary analysis, the effect on maternal dietary behavior was analyzed. Dietary behavior was assessed by means of a 58-item food frequency questionnaire in early and late pregnancy. The intervention resulted in a significant reduction in soft drink intake (p < 0.001) and an increase in the consumption of fish (p = 0.002) and vegetables (p = 0.023). With the exception of higher percentage energy from protein (p = 0.018), no effects of the intervention on energy and macronutrient intake were observed. There was no evidence for an overall effect on dietary quality measured with a healthy eating index. Some dietary variables were shown to be associated with GWG. In a routine prenatal care setting in Germany, lifestyle advice modified single aspects of dietary behavior, but not energy intake or overall dietary quality.

KEYWORDS:

diet; dietary behavior; exercise; gestational weight gain (GWG); lifestyle intervention; nutrition; obesity prevention; pregnancy

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