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Natl Med J India. 2018 Sep-Oct;31(5):296-300. doi: 10.4103/0970-258X.261191.

Early clinical exposure through a vertical integration programme in physiology.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology, St John's Medical College, John Nagar, Bengaluru 560034, Karnataka, India.
2
Department of Paediatric Nephrology, St John's Medical College, John Nagar, Bengaluru 560034, Karnataka, India.
3
Department of Gastroenterology, St John's Medical College, John Nagar, Bengaluru 560034, Karnataka, India.
4
Department of Neurology, St John's Medical College, John Nagar, Bengaluru 560034, Karnataka, India.
5
Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical care, St John's Medical College, John Nagar, Bengaluru 560034, Karnataka, India.
6
Department of Internal Medicine, St John's Medical College, John Nagar, Bengaluru 560034, Karnataka, India.
7
Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, St John's Medical College, John Nagar, Bengaluru 560034, Karnataka, India.

Abstract

Background.:

Early clinical exposure is likely to be beneficial during the preclinical year. This pilot programme aimed to define a learning framework of introducing first year medical students to early clinical exposure through a vertical integration programme in the physiology course. The intent was to enhance the understanding of theoretical concepts and practical applications of physiology. Student and faculty perceptions were evaluated.

Methods.:

First year MBBS students (n = 60) had bedside clinics conducted by 5 clinical departments, where the clinical context and applied physiological concepts were emphasized. Clinical sessions were synchronized with pedagogic highlights on related physiological concepts. The student's perceptions were recorded through a semi-structured questionnaire, while qualitative feedback was obtained from the faculty.

Results.:

All students ( 100%) reported that the programme was relevant and did not interfere with their physiology course. Most (91%) appreciated the synchronization of classroom knowledge with clinical exposures, and thought that integrated teaching helped in better understanding of practical applications of physiology (94%) with adequate discussions during the sessions (91 %). Fifty-nine (98%) students preferred integrated teaching over the isolated traditional classroom teaching. The clinicians involved also felt that the early clinical exposure was relevant. The students achieved a mean (SD) score of 13 (2.98) of 25 in the quiz consisting of multiple-choice questions that attempted to test their learning through early clinical exposures.

Conclusion.:

This pilot exercise showed the utility of early clinical exposure integrated into the physiology course. It will be worthwhile to replicate this exercise at other institutions and among a larger student strength.

PMID:
31267999
DOI:
10.4103/0970-258X.261191

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