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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2019 Oct 1;104(10):4619-4625. doi: 10.1210/jc.2018-02362.

Antidepressants Reduced Risk of Mortality in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus: A Population-Based Cohort Study in Taiwan.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Chang Gung Medical Foundation, Chiayi Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
3
Department for Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan.
4
Health Information and Epidemiology Laboratory, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan.
5
Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
6
Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
7
Department of Psychiatry, Wan-Fang Hospital and School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan.
8
Graduate Institute of Integrated Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.
9
Department of Internal Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
10
Department of Internal Medicine, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua, Taiwan.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

The effect of antidepressant (ATD) use on mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) has not yet been sufficiently studied, although comorbid depression is common in this population.

OBJECTIVE:

To explore the impact of ATDs on mortality among DM patients.

DESIGN:

A retrospective cohort study in a national database.

SETTING:

This population-based study used the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. Since 2000, we identified 53,412 cases of newly diagnosed patients with DM and depression. Patient cases were followed for assessing mortality until 2013.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

The association between mortality and ATD use was explored adjusting for cumulative dosing.

RESULTS:

Using the time-dependent Cox regression model, ATD use was associated with significantly reduced mortality among patients with DM [in the highest dose group: hazard ratio (HR), 0.65; 95% CI, 0.59 to 0.71]. Further analysis showed that differences in mortality existed across ATD categories: selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (HR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.56 to 0.71), serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (HR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.44 to 0.78), norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitors (HR, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.07 to 0.63), mirtazapine (HR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.45 to 0.82), tricyclic/tetracyclic antidepressants (HR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.54 to 0.97), and trazodone (HR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.29 to 0.91). However, reversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase A (RIMA) was found to be associated with an increase, rather than a decrease, in total mortality (HR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.99).

CONCLUSION:

Most ATDs, but not RIMA, were associated with significantly reduced mortality among a population with comorbid DM and depression.

PMID:
31265070
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2018-02362

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