Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Vet Comp Oncol. 2019 Jul 2. doi: 10.1111/vco.12518. [Epub ahead of print]

Prognostic and predictive significance of KIT protein expression and c-kit gene mutation in canine cutaneous mast cell tumours: A consensus of the Oncology-Pathology Working Group.

Author information

1
Flint Animal Cancer Center, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado.
2
Dick White Referrals, Cambridge, UK.
3
Advanced Veterinary Specialty Group, Tustin, California.
4
Hope Veterinary Specialists, Malvern, Pennsylvania.
5
Integrative Veterinary Oncology, Phoenix, Arizona.
6
Department of Clinical Sciences, North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, North Carolina.
7
PetCure Oncology, Sugar Land, Texas.
8
KamPath Diagnostics & Investigation, Fort Collins, Colorado.
9
VCA Alta Vista Animal Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
10
Antech Diagnostics, Hillsborough, North Carolina.
11
VDX Pathology, Davis, California.
12
Powell Torrance Diagnostic Services, Hertfordshire, UK.
13
Charleston Veterinary Referral Center, Charleston, South Carolina.
14
Genentech, South San Francisco, California.

Abstract

One of the primary objectives of the Oncology-Pathology Working Group (OPWG), a joint initiative of the Veterinary Cancer Society and the American College of Veterinary Pathologists, is for oncologists and pathologists to collaboratively generate consensus documents to standardize aspects of and provide guidelines for oncologic pathology. Consensus is established through critical review of peer-reviewed literature relevant to a subgroup's particular focus. Subsequent acceptance and approval of the document by the OPWG membership at large establishes consensus. The intent of this publication is to help educate practitioners and pathologists on the value of diagnostics related to the KIT receptor tyrosine kinase for canine cutaneous mast cell tumours and to provide a guide for the use of these tests in veterinary medicine. This document represents the opinions of the OPWG and the authors and does not constitute a formal endorsement by the American College of Veterinary Pathologists or the Veterinary Cancer Society.

KEYWORDS:

cancer; dog; immunohistochemistry; kinase; mutation

PMID:
31264352
DOI:
10.1111/vco.12518

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center