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Sci Rep. 2019 Jul 1;9(1):9428. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-45878-6.

Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-gamma agonists exhibit anti-inflammatory and antiviral effects in an EcoHIV mouse model.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
2
Department of Medicine - Division of Infectious Diseases, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City, USA.
3
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. r.bendayan@utoronto.ca.

Abstract

The widespread use of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has resulted in significantly reduced deaths from HIV-1 associated complications and opportunistic infections. However, it is estimated that up to 50% of HIV-1 infected individuals still develop HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). With no treatment currently available for patients, there is a critical need to identify therapeutic approaches that can treat this disorder. Evidence suggests that targeting Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-gamma (PPARγ) can be anti-inflammatory in neurological disorders. Here we show that treatment with PPARγ agonists (rosiglitazone or pioglitazone) in primary cultures of mouse glial cells reversed EcoHIV-induced inflammatory genes (TNFα, IL-1β, CCL2, CCL3, CXCL10) and indicator of oxidative stress (iNOS). Furthermore, in vivo, mice administered with EcoHIV through intracranial injection resulted in upregulation of inflammatory genes (TNFα, IL-1β, IFNγ, CCL2, CCL3, CXCL10) and oxidative stress marker (iNOS) in the brain which was reversed through intraperitoneal administration of PPARγ agonists (rosiglitazone or pioglitazone). Finally, we demonstrated that treatment with these compounds in vivo reduced EcoHIV p24 protein burden in the brain. Our results suggest that treatment with PPARγ agonists are anti-inflammatory and antiviral in an in vivo model of EcoHIV infection. These drugs hold promise as potential candidates for HAND treatment in the future.

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