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Neurol Clin. 2019 Aug;37(3):615-629. doi: 10.1016/j.ncl.2019.03.004. Epub 2019 May 11.

Sleep and Circadian Medicine: Time of Day in the Neurologic Clinic.

Author information

1
Division of Human Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Center for Chronobiology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 240 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA; Division of Immunobiology, Department of Pediatrics, Center for Chronobiology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 240 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA.
2
Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA; Division of Pulmonary and Sleep Medicine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA; Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Cincinnati School of Medicine, 231 Albert Sabin Way, Cincinnati, OH 45267, USA. Electronic address: David.Smith3@cchmc.org.

Abstract

Fundamental aspects of neurobiology are time-of-day regulated. Therefore, it is not surprising that neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases are accompanied by sleep and circadian rhythm disruption. Although the direction of causation remains unclear, abnormal sleep-wake patterns often occur early in disease, exacerbate progression, and are a common primary complaint from patients. Circadian medicine incorporates knowledge of 24-hour biological rhythms to improve treatment. This article highlights how research and technologic advances in circadian biology might translate to improved patient care.

KEYWORDS:

Chronotherapy; Circadian medicine; Circadian rhythms; Neurology; Sleep medicine

PMID:
31256793
DOI:
10.1016/j.ncl.2019.03.004

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