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Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep. 2019 Jun 29;19(8):56. doi: 10.1007/s11910-019-0966-3.

Recent Advancement and Clinical Implications of 18FDG-PET in Parkinson's Disease, Atypical Parkinsonisms, and Other Movement Disorders.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, CEMIC University Hospital, Elias Galván 4102, C1431FWO, Buenos Aires, Argentina. ceciliaperalta@yahoo.com.ar.
2
Department of Biostatistics, School of Science and Technology, National University of San Martín, Campus Miguelete, 25 de Mayo y Francia, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
3
Department of Neurology, CEMIC University Hospital, Elias Galván 4102, C1431FWO, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
4
Department of Molecular and Metabolic Imaging, CEMIC University Hospital, Elias Galván, 4102, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

The molecular imaging field has been very instrumental in identifying the multiple network interactions that compose the human brain. The cerebral glucose metabolism is associated with neural function. 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose-PET (FDG-PET) studies reflect brain metabolism in a pattern-specific manner. This article reviews FDG-PET studies in Parkinson's disease (PD), atypical parkinsonism (AP), Huntington's disease (HD), and dystonia.

RECENT FINDINGS:

The metabolic pattern of PD, disease progression, non-motor symptoms such as fatigue, depression, apathy, impulse control disorders, and cognitive impairment, and the risk of progression to dementia have been identified with FDG-PET studies. In prodromal PD, the REM sleep behavior disorder-related covariance pattern has been described. In AP, FDG-PET studies have demonstrated to be superior to D2/D3 SPECT in differentiating PD from AP. The metabolic patterns of HD and dystonia have also been described. FDG-PET studies are an excellent tool to identify patterns of brain metabolism.

KEYWORDS:

18FDG-PET studies; Atypical parkinsonisms; Dystonia; Huntington’s disease; Parkinson’s disease; Prodromal parkinsonism

PMID:
31256288
DOI:
10.1007/s11910-019-0966-3

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