Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Gait Posture. 2019 Jun 19;72:202-205. doi: 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2019.06.012. [Epub ahead of print]

Trunk flexion during walking in people with knee osteoarthritis.

Author information

1
Centre for Health Sciences Research, University of Salford, Salford, Manchester, M6 6PU, United Kingdom. Electronic address: s.precce@salford.ac.uk.
2
Centre for Health Sciences Research, University of Salford, Salford, Manchester, M6 6PU, United Kingdom; General Directorate of Medical Rehabilitation, Ministry of Health (MOH), Saudi Arabia. Electronic address: Algarni@edu.salford.ac.uk.
3
Centre for Health Sciences Research, University of Salford, Salford, Manchester, M6 6PU, United Kingdom. Electronic address: r.k.jones@salford.ac.uk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Over 50% of the body's mass is concentrated within the head, arms and trunk. Thus, small deviations in the orientation of the trunk, during normal walking, could influence the position of the centre of mass relative to the lower limb joint centres and impact on lower limb biomechanics. However, there are minimal data available on sagittal kinematics of the trunk in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA) during walking.

RESEARCH QUESTION:

Do people with knee OA have altered kinematic patterns of the trunk, pelvis or hip compared with healthy control participants during walking?

METHODS:

Statistical parametric mapping was used to compare sagittal and frontal plane kinematic patterns, during walking, between a healthy group and cohort of people with knee OA.

RESULTS:

Individuals with knee OA walked with a mean increase in trunk flexion of 2.6°. Although this difference was more pronounced during early stance, it was maintained across the whole of stance phase. There were no differences, between the groups, in sagittal plane pelvic or hip kinematics. There were also no differences in trunk, pelvic or hip kinematics in the frontal plane.

SIGNIFICANCE:

Most previous gait research investigating trunk motion in people with knee OA has focused on the frontal plane. However, our data suggest that an increase in sagittal trunk flexion may be a clinical hallmark of people with this disease. Altered trunk flexion could affect joint moments and muscle patterns and therefore our results motivate further research in this area.

KEYWORDS:

Knee OA; Osteoarthritis; Pelvis; Thorax; Trunk flexion; Trunk inclination; kinematics

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center