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J Hosp Med. 2019 Jun 19;14:E1-E4. doi: 10.12788/jhm.3210. [Epub ahead of print]

Progress (?) Toward Reducing Pediatric Readmissions.

Author information

1
Division of Hospital Medicine and James M. Anderson Center for Healthcare Improvement, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center; Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio.
2
Children's Hospital Association, Washington, DC.
3
Monroe Carell, Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt, Nashville, Tennessee.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of South Carolina, College of Medicine, Charleston, South Carolina.
5
Office of the Chief Medical Officer, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio.
6
Division of Emergency Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
7
Division of Hospital-Based Medicine, Ann and Robert H Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.
8
Department of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine; Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia.
9
Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, Connecticut.
10
Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, Georgia.
11
Children's Health System of Texas, Dallas, Texas.
12
Division of Emergency Medicine, Seattle Children's Hospital; Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington.
13
Division of General Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia; Department of Pediatrics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Abstract

Many children's hospitals are actively working to reduce readmissions to improve care and avoid financial penalties. We sought to determine if pediatric readmission rates have changed over time. We used data from 66 hospitals in the Inpatient Essentials Database including index hospitalizations from January, 2010 through June, 2016. Seven-day all cause (AC) and potentially preventable readmission (PPR) rates were calculated using 3M PPR software. Total and condition-specific quarterly AC and PPR rates were generated for each hospital and in aggregate. We included 4.52 million hospitalizations across all study years. Readmission rates did not vary over the study period. The median seven-day PPR rate across all quarters was 2.5% (range 2.1%-2.5%); the median seven-day AC rate across all quarters was 5.1% (range 4.3%-5.3%). Readmission rates for individual conditions fluctuated. Despite significant national efforts to reduce pediatric readmissions, both AC and PPR readmission rates have remained unchanged over six years.

PMID:
31251150
DOI:
10.12788/jhm.3210

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