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Int J Public Health. 2019 Sep;64(7):985-998. doi: 10.1007/s00038-019-01275-4. Epub 2019 Jun 27.

Behavioral interventions promoting HIV serostatus disclosure to sex partners among HIV-positive men who have sex with men: a systematic review.

Author information

1
Paediatric Dentistry & Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong. Prince Philip Dental Hospital, Hong Kong SAR, China.
2
Public Health and Healthy Ageing Research Group, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China.
3
Paediatric Dentistry & Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong. Prince Philip Dental Hospital, Hong Kong SAR, China. wonghmg@hku.hk.
4
Public Health and Healthy Ageing Research Group, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China. wonghmg@hku.hk.
5
Department of Social Medicine and Health Education, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China.
6
Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University, Boston, USA.
7
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
8
Department of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This review aimed to identify intervention components which were effective to promote disclosure of HIV status among men have sex with men (MSM) living with HIV, particularly from a theoretical perspective.

METHODS:

A systematic review was performed through searching electronic databases, HIV-related conferences websites, and registered ongoing randomized controlled trials. Studies were included if they reported intervention evaluation results related to HIV disclosure and published before December 31, 2017. Two independent reviewers collected studies and extracted data.

RESULTS:

Eight studies met the inclusion criteria and were summarized. Interventions appeared effective in promoting HIV disclosure to their sex partners among MSM living with HIV if they were theory based (e.g., consequence theory and social cognitive theory). Key elements of effective interventions consisted of increasing disclosure self-efficacy, highlighting disclosure benefits, assisting risk assessment, developing disclosure strategy, and using messages under social influence.

CONCLUSIONS:

Findings of this review imply that future interventions are more likely to succeed if they apply consequence theory, social cognitive theory, and trans-theoretical model of behavior change and include multiple key intervention components.

KEYWORDS:

Disclosure; HIV; Intervention studies; Men who have sex with men; Systematic review

PMID:
31250027
DOI:
10.1007/s00038-019-01275-4

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