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Science. 2019 Jun 28;364(6447). pii: eaaw5181. doi: 10.1126/science.aaw5181.

Sequential replay of nonspatial task states in the human hippocampus.

Author information

1
Max Planck Research Group NeuroCode, Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Lentzeallee 94, 14195 Berlin, Germany. schuck@mpib-berlin.mpg.de yael@princeton.edu.
2
Max Planck University College London (UCL) Centre for Computational Psychiatry and Ageing Research, Berlin, Germany, and London, UK.
3
Princeton Neuroscience Institute and Department of Psychology, Princeton University, Washington Road, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA.
4
Princeton Neuroscience Institute and Department of Psychology, Princeton University, Washington Road, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA. schuck@mpib-berlin.mpg.de yael@princeton.edu.

Abstract

Sequential neural activity patterns related to spatial experiences are "replayed" in the hippocampus of rodents during rest. We investigated whether replay of nonspatial sequences can be detected noninvasively in the human hippocampus. Participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while resting after performing a decision-making task with sequential structure. Hippocampal fMRI patterns recorded at rest reflected sequentiality of previously experienced task states, with consecutive patterns corresponding to nearby states. Hippocampal sequentiality correlated with the fidelity of task representations recorded in the orbitofrontal cortex during decision-making, which were themselves related to better task performance. Our findings suggest that hippocampal replay may be important for building representations of complex, abstract tasks elsewhere in the brain and establish feasibility of investigating fast replay signals with fMRI.

PMID:
31249030
DOI:
10.1126/science.aaw5181

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