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Nature. 2019 Jun 26. doi: 10.1038/s41586-019-1338-5. [Epub ahead of print]

Gene expression across mammalian organ development.

Author information

1
Center for Molecular Biology of Heidelberg University (ZMBH), Heidelberg, Germany. m.moreira@zmbh.uni-heidelberg.de.
2
Center for Integrative Genomics, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. m.moreira@zmbh.uni-heidelberg.de.
3
Center for Integrative Genomics, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland.
4
Genome Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg, Germany.
5
Key Laboratory of Zoological Systematics and Evolution, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
6
State Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Pest Insects and Rodents, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
7
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China.
8
Center for Molecular Biology of Heidelberg University (ZMBH), Heidelberg, Germany.
9
Center for Neurobiology and Brain Restoration, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Moscow, Russia.
10
Institute for Information Transmission Problems (Kharkevich Institute) RAS, Moscow, Russia.
11
Faculty of Computer Science, HSE University, Moscow, Russia.
12
Institute of Medical Genetics, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
13
Laboratory of Behavioral Genetics, Brain Mind Institute, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland.
14
Institute for Reproduction and Perinatal Research, Departments of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and Pediatrics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, MO, USA.
15
Center for Perinatal Research, Children's Research Institute, Children's Mercy, Kansas City, MO, USA.
16
Departamento de Anatomia, Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal.
17
ICBAS (Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas Abel Salazar), UMIB (Unidade Multidisciplinar de Investigação Biomédica), Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal.
18
CIBIO/InBIO, Centro de Investigacão em Biodiversidade e Recursos Genéticos, Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal.
19
Departamento de Biologia, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal.
20
Sex Chromosome Biology Laboratory, The Francis Crick Institute, London, UK.
21
South Texas Diabetes and Obesity Institute, School of Medicine, The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Brownsville, Harlingen and Edinburg, TX, USA.
22
The Department of Human Genetics, School of Medicine, The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Brownsville, Harlingen and Edinburg, TX, USA.
23
AVIAN Behavioural Genomics and Physiology Group, IFM Biology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
24
Platform Degenerative Diseases, German Primate Center, Leibniz Institute for Primate Research (DPZ), Göttingen, Germany.
25
DZHK (German Center for Cardiovascular Research), Partner Site Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.
26
Human Developmental Biology Resource, Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK.
27
Center for Excellence in Animal Evolution and Genetics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, China.
28
CAS Key Laboratory of Computational Biology, CAS-MPG Partner Institute for Computational Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China.
29
Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA.
30
Center for Molecular Biology of Heidelberg University (ZMBH), Heidelberg, Germany. h.kaessmann@zmbh.uni-heidelberg.de.

Abstract

The evolution of gene expression in mammalian organ development remains largely uncharacterized. Here we report the transcriptomes of seven organs (cerebrum, cerebellum, heart, kidney, liver, ovary and testis) across developmental time points from early organogenesis to adulthood for human, rhesus macaque, mouse, rat, rabbit, opossum and chicken. Comparisons of gene expression patterns identified correspondences of developmental stages across species, and differences in the timing of key events during the development of the gonads. We found that the breadth of gene expression and the extent of purifying selection gradually decrease during development, whereas the amount of positive selection and expression of new genes increase. We identified differences in the temporal trajectories of expression of individual genes across species, with brain tissues showing the smallest percentage of trajectory changes, and the liver and testis showing the largest. Our work provides a resource of developmental transcriptomes of seven organs across seven species, and comparative analyses that characterize the development and evolution of mammalian organs.

PMID:
31243369
DOI:
10.1038/s41586-019-1338-5

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