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J Gen Intern Med. 2019 Sep;34(9):1782-1789. doi: 10.1007/s11606-019-05102-7. Epub 2019 Jun 25.

"Get Ready and Empowered About Treatment" (GREAT) Study: a Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial of Activation in Persons Living with HIV.

Author information

1
Department of Family Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA.
2
Clinical Directors Network, Inc. (CDN), New York, NY, USA.
3
Department of Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA.
4
Department of Family Medicine, Family Medicine Research Programs, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA.
5
Department of Family Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA.
6
Department of Psychiatry, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA.
7
Department of Family Medicine, Family Medicine Research Programs, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA. Kevin_fiscella@urmc.rochester.edu.
8
Department of Family Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA. Kevin_fiscella@urmc.rochester.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Little is known about strategies to improve patient activation, particularly among persons living with HIV (PLWH).

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the impact of a group intervention and individual coaching on patient activation for PLWH.

DESIGN:

Pragmatic randomized controlled trial.

SITES:

Eight practices in New York and two in New Jersey serving PLWH.

PARTICIPANTS:

Three hundred sixty PLWH who received care at participating practices and had at least limited English proficiency and basic literacy.

INTERVENTION:

Six 90-min group training sessions covering use of an ePersonal Health Record loaded onto a handheld mobile device and a single 20-30 min individual pre-visit coaching session.

MAIN MEASURES:

The primary outcome was change in Patient Activation Measure (PAM). Secondary outcomes were changes in eHealth literacy (eHEALS), Decision Self-efficacy (DSES), Perceived Involvement in Care Scale (PICS), health (SF-12), receipt of HIV-related care, and change in HIV viral load (VL).

KEY RESULTS:

The intervention group showed significantly greater improvement than the control group in the primary outcome, the PAM (difference 2.82: 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.32-5.32). Effects were largest among participants with lowest quartile PAM at baseline (p < 0.05). The intervention doubled the odds of improving one level on the PAM (odds ratio 1.96; 95% CI 1.16-3.31). The intervention group also had significantly greater improvement in eHEALS (difference 2.67: 95% CI 1.38-3.9) and PICS (1.27: 95% CI 0.41-2.13) than the control group. Intervention effects were similar by race/ethnicity and low education with the exception of eHealth literacy where effects were stronger for minority participants. No statistically significant effects were observed for decision self-efficacy, health status, adherence, receipt of HIV relevant care, or HIV viral load.

CONCLUSIONS:

The patient activation intervention modestly improved several domains related to patient empowerment; effects on patient activation were largest among those with the lowest levels of baseline patient activation.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

This study is registered at Clinical Trials.Gov (NCT02165735).

KEYWORDS:

HIV; computer literacy; health literacy; patient participation; self-care

PMID:
31240605
PMCID:
PMC6712153
[Available on 2020-09-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s11606-019-05102-7

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