Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Rep. 2019 Jun 25;9(1):9255. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-45577-2.

Ultrasound-mediated blood-brain barrier opening enhances delivery of therapeutically relevant formats of a tau-specific antibody.

Author information

1
Clem Jones Centre for Ageing Dementia Research, Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, St Lucia Campus, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia.
2
Clem Jones Centre for Ageing Dementia Research, Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, St Lucia Campus, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia. j.goetz@uq.edu.au.
3
Clem Jones Centre for Ageing Dementia Research, Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, St Lucia Campus, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia. r.nisbet@uq.edu.au.

Abstract

The microtubule-associated protein tau is an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies as its aggregation strongly correlates with disease progression and is considered a key mediator of neuronal toxicity. Delivery of most therapeutics to the brain is, however, inefficient, due to their limited ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Therapeutic ultrasound is an emerging non-invasive technology which transiently opens the BBB in a focused manner to allow peripherally delivered molecules to effectively enter the brain. In order to open a large area of the BBB, we developed a scanning ultrasound (SUS) approach by which ultrasound is applied in a sequential pattern across the whole brain. We have previously shown that delivery of an anti-tau antibody in a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) format to the brain is increased with SUS allowing for an enhanced therapeutic effect. Here we compared the delivery of an anti-tau antibody, RN2N, in an scFv, fragment antigen-binding (Fab) and full-sized immunoglobulin G (IgG) format, with and without sonication, into the brain of pR5 tau transgenic mice, a model of tauopathy. Our results revealed that the full-sized IgG reaches a higher concentration in the brain compared with the smaller formats by bypassing renal excretion. No differences in either the ultrasound-mediated uptake or distribution in the brain from the sonication site was observed across the different antibody formats, suggesting that ultrasound can be used to successfully increase the delivery of therapeutic molecules of various sizes into the brain for the treatment of neurological diseases.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center