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BMC Infect Dis. 2019 Jun 25;19(1):555. doi: 10.1186/s12879-019-4184-z.

Clusterization of co-morbidities and multi-morbidities among persons living with HIV: a cross-sectional study.

Author information

1
Infectious Diseases Clinic University of Campania "Luigi Vanvitelli", Neaples, Italy.
2
Infectious Diseases Clinic, University of Bari, Bari, Italy.
3
Infectious Diseases Clinic, Department of Medicine 2, Azienda Ospedaliera di Perugia and University of Perugia, Santa Maria Hospital, Perugia, Italy.
4
Department of Women, Child and Neonate, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy. ed.ricci@libero.it.
5
Division I of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, ASL Città di Torino, Torino, Italy.
6
Unit of Infectious Diseases, ASST della Valle Olona, Busto Arsizio, VA, Italy.
7
Infectious Diseases, San Martino Hospital Genoa, Genoa, Italy.
8
Infectious Diseases Unit ASST-MONZA, San Gerardo Hospital-University of Milano-Bicocca, Monza, Italy.
9
Infectious Diseases Clinic, "Santa Maria" Hospital, University of Perugia, Terni, Italy.
10
Infectious Diseases Unit, Santa Maria Annunziata Hospital, Usl centro, Florence, Italy.
11
Unit of Infectious Diseases, A. Manzoni Hospital, Lecco, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Among people living with HIV (PLWH), the prevalence of non-HIV related co-morbidities is increasing. Aim of the present study is to describe co-morbidity and multi-morbidity, their clustering mode and the potential disease-disease interactions in a cohort of Italian HIV patients.

METHODS:

Cross-sectional analysis conducted by the Coordinamento Italiano per lo Studio di Allergia e Infezioni da HIV (CISAI) on adult subjects attending HIV-outpatient facilities. Non-HIV co-morbidities included: cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, oncologic diseases, osteoporosis, probable case of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, psychiatric illness, kidney disease. Multi-morbidity was defined as the presence of two or more co-morbidities.

RESULTS:

One thousand and eighty-seven patients were enrolled in the study (mean age 47.9 ± 10.8). One hundred-ninety patients (17.5%) had no co-morbidity, whereas 285 (26.2%) had one condition and 612 (56.3%) were multi-morbid. The most recurrent associations were: 1) dyslipidemia + hypertension (237, 21.8%); 2) dyslipidemia + COPD (188, 17.3%); 3) COPD + HCV-Ab+ (141, 12.9%). Multi-morbidity was associated with older age, higher body mass index, current and former smoking, CDC stage C and longer ART duration.

CONCLUSIONS:

More than 50% of PLHW were multi-morbid and about 30% had three or more concurrent comorbidities. The identification of common patterns of comorbidities address the combined risks of multiple drug and disease-disease interactions.

KEYWORDS:

Clusterization; Co-morbidity; Disease-disease interactions; HIV; Multi-morbidity

PMID:
31238916
PMCID:
PMC6593514
DOI:
10.1186/s12879-019-4184-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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