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Mayo Clin Proc. 2019 Sep;94(9):1834-1839. doi: 10.1016/j.mayocp.2019.05.006. Epub 2019 Jun 22.

Oncolytic Measles Virotherapy and Opposition to Measles Vaccination.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Division of Hematology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. Electronic address: sjr@mayo.edu.
2
Division of Medical Genetics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.
3
Vyriad, Rochester, MN.
4
Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.
5
Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Division of Hematology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.
6
Division of Hematology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.
7
Department of Hematology, UCL Cancer Institute, London, UK.
8
Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Division of Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.
9
Department of Urology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.
10
Division of Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.
11
Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco.
12
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.
13
UAMS Myeloma Center, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock.
14
Department of Medical Oncology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
15
Department of Urology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL.

Abstract

Recent measles epidemics in US and European cities where vaccination coverage has declined are providing a harsh reminder for the need to maintain protective levels of immunity across the entire population. Vaccine uptake rates have been declining in large part because of public misinformation regarding a possible association between measles vaccination and autism for which there is no scientific basis. The purpose of this article is to address a new misinformed antivaccination argument-that measles immunity is undesirable because measles virus is protective against cancer. Having worked for many years to develop engineered measles viruses as anticancer therapies, we have concluded (1) that measles is not protective against cancer and (2) that its potential utility as a cancer therapy will be enhanced, not diminished, by prior vaccination.

PMID:
31235278
PMCID:
PMC6800178
[Available on 2020-09-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.mayocp.2019.05.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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