Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Liver Int. 2019 Aug;39(8):1490-1503. doi: 10.1111/liv.14182. Epub 2019 Jul 10.

Family history of liver cancer may modify the association between HBV infection and liver cancer in a Chinese population.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Fielding School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, California.
2
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
3
Jiangsu Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China.
4
Dafeng Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Dafeng, Jiangsu, China.
5
Ganyu Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Ganyu, Jiangsu, China.
6
Chuzhou County Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Chuzhou, Jiangsu, China.
7
Tongshan County Center for Disease control and Prevention, Tongshan, Jiangsu, China.
8
Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, California.
9
School of Nursing, UCLA, Los Angeles, California.
10
Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, New York.
11
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, China.
12
Center for Human Nutrition, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, California.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

The potential interaction between family history of liver cancer and HBV infection on liver cancer has not been fully examined.

METHODS:

We conducted a population-based case-control study composed of 2011 liver cancer cases and 7933 controls in Jiangsu province, China from 2003 to 2010. Data on major risk or protective factors were collected and HBV/HCV sero-markers were assayed using blood samples. Semi-Bayes (SB) adjustments were applied to provide posterior estimates.

RESULTS:

Both family history of liver cancer (adjusted odds ratios [OR]: 4.32, 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 3.25-5.73) and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positivity (adjusted OR: 9.94, 95% CI: 8.33-11.87) were strongly associated with liver cancer development. For individuals with different combinations of serological markers, the adjusted ORs were 8.45 (95% CI: 5.16-13.82) for HBsAg- and HBcAb-positive; 7.57 (95% CI: 4.87-11.77) for HBsAg-, HBeAg- and HBcAb-positive; and 3.62 (95% CI: 2.47-5.31) for HBsAg-, HBeAb- and HBcAb-positive, compared to all negatives in HBV serological markers. One log increase in HBV DNA level was associated with 17% increased risk (adjusted OR: 1.17, 95% CI: 1.03-1.32). The SB-adjusted OR of HBV-positive individuals with family history of liver cancer was 41.34 (95% posterior interval [PI]: 23.69-72.12) compared with those HBV-negative without family history. Relative excess risk due to additive interaction, the attributable proportion and synergy index were 73.13, 0.87 and 8.04 respectively. Adjusted ratio of OR for multiplicative interaction was 2.84 (95% CI: 1.41-5.75).

CONCLUSIONS:

Super-additive and super-multiplicative interactions may exist between family history of liver cancer and HBV infection on the development of liver cancer.

KEYWORDS:

family history; hepatitis B Virus; hepatocellular carcinoma; interaction; serological marker

PMID:
31228882
PMCID:
PMC6705127
[Available on 2020-08-01]
DOI:
10.1111/liv.14182

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center