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Pan Afr Med J. 2019 Mar 15;32:123. doi: 10.11604/pamj.2019.32.123.16093. eCollection 2019.

Comparing static and outreach immunization strategies and associated factors in Uganda, Nov-Dec 2016.

Author information

1
Uganda National Expanded Program on Immunization, Ministry of Health, Kampala, Uganda.
2
Uganda Public Health Fellowship Program, Field Epidemiology Track, Ministry of Health, Kampala, Uganda.

Abstract

Introduction:

the government of Uganda aims at reducing childhood morbidity through provision of immunization services. We compared the proportion of children 12-33 months reached using either static or outreach immunization strategies and factors affecting utilization of routine vaccination services in order to inform policy updates.

Methods:

we adopted the 2015 vaccination coverage cluster survey technique. The sample selection was based on a stratified three-stage sample design. Using the Fleiss formula, a sample of 50 enumeration areas was sufficient to generate immunization coverages at each region. A total of 200 enumeration areas were selected for the survey. Thirty households were selected per enumeration area. Epi-Info software was used to calculate weighted coverage estimates. facility.

Results:

among the 2231 vaccinated children aged 12-23 months who participated in the survey, 68.1% received immunization services from a health unit and 10.6% from outreaches. The factors that affected utilization of routine vaccination services were; accessibility, where 78.2% resided within 5km from a health. 29.7% missed vaccination due to lack of vaccines at the health facility. Other reasons were lack of supplies at 39.2% and because the caretaker had other things to do, 26.4%. The survey showed 1.8% (40/2271) respondents had not vaccinated their children. Among these, 70% said they had not vaccinated their child because they were busy doing other things and 27.5% had not done so because of lack of motivation.

Conclusion:

almost 7 in 10 children aged 12-23 months access vaccination at health facilities. There is evidence of parental apathy as well as misconceptions about vaccination.

KEYWORDS:

Uganda; Vaccination; survey; vaccination coverage

PMID:
31223412
PMCID:
PMC6561008
DOI:
10.11604/pamj.2019.32.123.16093
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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