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Sci Rep. 2019 Jun 19;9(1):8732. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-45337-2.

Community Composition and Year-round Abundance of Vector Species of Mosquitoes make Miami-Dade County, Florida a Receptive Gateway for Arbovirus entry to the United States.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health Sciences, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, United States of America. axb1737@med.miami.edu.
2
Miami-Dade County Mosquito Control Division, Miami, FL, United States of America.
3
Department of Public Health Sciences, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, United States of America.

Abstract

Vector-borne diseases are a heavy burden to human-kind. Global warming and urbanization have a significant impact on vector-borne disease transmission, resulting in more severe outbreaks, and outbreaks in formerly non-endemic areas. Miami-Dade County, Florida was the most affected area in the continental United States during the 2016 Zika virus outbreak. Miami is an important gateway and has suitable conditions for mosquitoes year-round. Therefore, it was critical to establish and validate a surveillance system to guide and improve mosquito control operations. Here we assess two years of mosquito surveillance in Miami established after the 2016 Zika virus outbreak. Our results show that the most abundant mosquito species are either well adapted to urban environments or are adapting to it. The five most abundant species comprised 85% of all specimens collected, with four of them being primary vectors of arboviruses. Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus were found year-round throughout Miami regardless of urbanization level, vegetation, or socioeconomic variations. This study serves as a foundation for future efforts to improve mosquito surveillance and control operations.

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