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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2019 Jul 2;116(27):13239-13248. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1901193116. Epub 2019 Jun 19.

Buckling and twisting of advanced materials into morphable 3D mesostructures.

Zhao H1, Li K2,3,4, Han M1, Zhu F2,3,4,5, Vázquez-Guardado A6,7, Guo P8, Xie Z2,3,4,9, Park Y1, Chen L10, Wang X1,11, Luan H2,3,4, Yang Y3, Wang H2,3,4, Liang C1,12,13, Xue Y2,3,4, Schaller RD8,14, Chanda D6,7,15, Huang Y16,2,3,4, Zhang Y17,18, Rogers JA16,3,4,14,19,20,21,22,23.

Author information

1
Center for Bio-Integrated Electronics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208.
2
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208.
3
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208.
4
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208.
5
School of Logistics Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, 430063 Wuhan, China.
6
NanoScience Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32826.
7
CREOL, The College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816.
8
Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439.
9
Department of Engineering Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, 116024 Dalian, China.
10
State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 710049 Xi'an, China.
11
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211.
12
Key Laboratory of Mechanism Theory and Equipment Design of Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, 300072 Tianjin, China.
13
School of Mechanical Engineering, Tianjin University, 300072 Tianjin, China.
14
Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208.
15
Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816.
16
Center for Bio-Integrated Electronics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208; y-huang@northwestern.edu yihuizhang@tsinghua.edu.cn jrogers@northwestern.edu.
17
Center for Flexible Electronics Technology, Tsinghua University, 100084 Beijing, China; y-huang@northwestern.edu yihuizhang@tsinghua.edu.cn jrogers@northwestern.edu.
18
Applied Mechanics Laboratory, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, 100084 Beijing, China.
19
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208.
20
Department of Neurological Surgery, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208.
21
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208.
22
Simpson Querrey Institute, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208.
23
Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208.

Abstract

Recently developed methods in mechanically guided assembly provide deterministic access to wide-ranging classes of complex, 3D structures in high-performance functional materials, with characteristic length scales that can range from nanometers to centimeters. These processes exploit stress relaxation in prestretched elastomeric platforms to affect transformation of 2D precursors into 3D shapes by in- and out-of-plane translational displacements. This paper introduces a scheme for introducing local twisting deformations into this process, thereby providing access to 3D mesostructures that have strong, local levels of chirality and other previously inaccessible geometrical features. Here, elastomeric assembly platforms segmented into interconnected, rotatable units generate in-plane torques imposed through bonding sites at engineered locations across the 2D precursors during the process of stress relaxation. Nearly 2 dozen examples illustrate the ideas through a diverse variety of 3D structures, including those with designs inspired by the ancient arts of origami/kirigami and with layouts that can morph into different shapes. A mechanically tunable, multilayered chiral 3D metamaterial configured for operation in the terahertz regime serves as an application example guided by finite-element analysis and electromagnetic modeling.

KEYWORDS:

kirigami; metamaterials; origami; three-dimensional fabrication

PMID:
31217291
PMCID:
PMC6613082
[Available on 2019-12-19]
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1901193116

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

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