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Pediatr Obes. 2019 Nov;14(11):e12555. doi: 10.1111/ijpo.12555. Epub 2019 Jun 19.

Sleep duration and bedtime in preschool-age children with obesity: Relation to BMI and diet following a weight management intervention.

Author information

1
Division of Pulmonary & Sleep Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus & Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado, USA.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.
3
Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus & Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, Colorado, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Sleep duration is associated with obesity in preschoolers. Weight-management interventions may be an opportunity to incorporate sleep health recommendations.

OBJECTIVES:

To examine changes in sleep in preschool-age children with obesity following a family-based weight-management intervention (Learning about Activity and Understanding Nutrition for Child Health [LAUNCH]) compared with motivational interviewing and standard care conditions. Additionally, we examined associations between sleep with body mass index (BMI) z score (BMIz) and diet.

METHODS:

One hundred fifty-one children (4.6 ± 0.93 y) completed baseline (pretreatment) and posttreatment (week 24) assessments, including anthropometrics, 24-hour dietary recalls, and a 7-day sleep diary. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and chi-squared tests compared sleep variables between groups; linear regression models examined effects of sleep on BMIz and dietary intake at posttreatment, controlling for baseline values.

RESULTS:

Bedtime and sleep duration were not significantly different between treatment groups from baseline to posttreatment. After adjusting for baseline sleep, earlier bedtime was associated with lower BMIz (95% CI, 0.00-0.04; .03), intake of added sugars (95% CI, 0.70-4.32; .007), and sweet/dessert food servings (95% CI, 0.00-0.19; .04) at posttreatment. Longer night-time sleep duration was associated with fewer added sugars at posttreatment, adjusting for baseline sleep (95% CI, -3.79 to -0.35; .02).

CONCLUSIONS:

More comprehensive sleep intervention incorporated into weight-management intervention may be necessary to promote positive changes for preschoolers with obesity. A focus on earlier bedtime and longer sleep duration appears to be important given associations between sleep duration and bedtime with BMIz and dietary intake.

KEYWORDS:

lifestyle intervention; overweight; pediatrics; sleep restriction

PMID:
31215768
PMCID:
PMC6812590
[Available on 2020-11-01]
DOI:
10.1111/ijpo.12555

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