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BMC Neurol. 2019 Jun 18;19(1):133. doi: 10.1186/s12883-019-1363-x.

Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venography features in heat stroke: a case report.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, 130021, Jilin, China.
2
Norman Bethune Health Science Center of Jilin University, Changchun, 130000, Jilin, China.
3
Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Medical Optics, Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou, 215163, China.
4
Department of Neurology, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, 130021, Jilin, China. mingqin.zhu@hotmail.com.
5
Department of Neurology, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, 130021, Jilin, China. tianfeiluo@163.com.
6
Department of Neurology, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, 130021, Jilin, China. jialuochen@163.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Heat stroke (HS) is a critical illness that can cause multiple organ dysfunction, including damage to the central nervous system (CNS), which can be life-threatening in severe cases. Brain lesions in patients with HS who present with CNS damage have been rarely reported before, and they usually vary in different cases, hence, patients with such lesions may present a clinical challenge in terms of diagnosis and management. Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare cause of stroke that mostly affects young individuals and children. The pathogenesis of brain damage caused by HS is complex, and CVT may be involved in the pathogenesis of HS with CNS damage. In this manuscript, we have reported a case of a patient with HS having CVT with symmetrical lesions in the bilateral putamen, posterior limb of the internal capsule, external capsule, insular lobe, and subcortical white matter in the brain.

CASE PRESENTATION:

We encountered a 48-year-old man who presented with HS in the summer season. During admission, he had a high body temperature and was in coma and shock. Then, he developed rhabdomyolysis syndrome, acute kidney and liver damage, electrolyte imbalance, and acid-base balance disorders, and his D-dimer level was elevated. After several days of anti-shock treatment, the patient's level of consciousness improved. However, he experienced a decline in vision. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed symmetrical lesions in the bilateral posterior limb of the internal capsule, putamen, external capsule, insula, and subcortical white matter, and cerebral magnetic resonance venography (MRV) showed the development of CVT. Therefore, anti-coagulation treatment was provided. After timely clinical intervention, the symptoms of the patient gradually improved.

CONCLUSIONS:

This case showed that HS can cause CVT. Therefore, cerebral MRI findings in HS must be assessed; in addition, early MRV can help in the diagnosis of the disease, which can effectively improve prognosis.

KEYWORDS:

Brain lesions; Cerebral venous thrombosis; Heat stroke; Magnetic resonance imaging; Magnetic resonance venography

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