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Contemp Clin Trials. 2019 Aug;83:18-26. doi: 10.1016/j.cct.2019.06.001. Epub 2019 Jun 15.

Adaptation of a sustained care cessation intervention for smokers hospitalized for psychiatric disorders: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
School of Nursing, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, United States of America.
2
Tobacco Research and Treatment Center, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School Boston, MA, United States of America.
3
Department of Psychology, Fordham University, Bronx, NY, United States of America.
4
Ascension Seton Shoal Creek Hospital and Department of Psychiatry, Dell Medical School at the University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, United States of America.
5
Rhode Island Hospital and the Departments of Psychiatry and Human Behavior and Medicine, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, United States of America.
6
Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies and the Department of Behavioral and Social Sciences, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, RI, United States of America.
7
Butler Hospital and the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, United States of America.
8
Center for Wellbeing Research, Optum, Seattle, WA, United States of America.
9
School of Nursing, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, United States of America. Electronic address: brown2@utexas.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Individuals with serious mental illness (SMI) smoke at disproportionately higher rates than those without SMI, have lifespans 25-32 years shorter, and thus bear an especially large burden of tobacco-related morbidity and mortality. Several recent studies demonstrate that smokers with SMI can successfully quit smoking with adequate support. Further evidence shows that using technology to deliver sustained care interventions to hospitalized smokers can lead to smoking cessation up to 6 months after discharge. The current comparative effectiveness trial adapts a technology-assisted sustained care intervention designed for smokers admitted to a general hospital and tests whether this approach can produce higher cessation rates compared to usual care for smokers admitted to a psychiatric inpatient unit.

METHODS:

A total of 353 eligible patients hospitalized for psychiatric illness are randomized by cohort into one of two conditions, Sustained Care (SusC) or Usual Care (UC), and are followed for six months after discharge. Participants assigned to UC receive brief tobacco education delivered by a hospital nurse during or soon after admission. Those assigned to SusC receive a 40-min, in-hospital motivational counseling intervention. Upon discharge, they also receive up to 8 weeks of free nicotine patches, automated interactive voice response (IVR) telephone and text messaging, and access to cessation counseling resources lasting 3 months post discharge. Smoking cessation outcomes are measured at 1-, 3- and 6-months post hospital discharge.

CONCLUSION:

Results from this comparative effectiveness trial will add to our understanding of acceptable and effective smoking cessation approaches for patients hospitalized with SMI.

KEYWORDS:

Comparative effectiveness trial; Evidence-based interventions; Hospitalized smokers; Psychiatric illness; Smoking cessation; Technology-based interventions

PMID:
31212100
DOI:
10.1016/j.cct.2019.06.001

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