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Cell Motil Cytoskeleton. 1987;8(2):91-105.

Platelet-derived growth factor-induced alterations in vinculin distribution in porcine vascular smooth muscle cells.

Author information

1
Department of Anatomy, Lineberger Cancer Research Center, University of North Carolina Medical School, Chapel Hill 27514.

Abstract

Exposure of porcine vascular smooth muscle cells to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF; 18-180 ng/ml) but not epidermal growth factor (EGF; 30 ng/ml), somatomedin C (SmC; 30 ng/ml), or insulin (10 microM), results in a rapid, reversible, time- and concentration-dependent disappearance of vinculin staining in adhesion plaques; actin-containing stress fibers also become disrupted following exposure of cells to PDGF. Disappearance of vinculin staining from adhesion plaques is also caused by 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA; 200-400 nM), though the time course of the disappearance of vinculin staining under these conditions takes longer than in cells exposed to PDGF. The PDGF-induced removal of vinculin from adhesion plaques was inhibited in a concentration-dependent fashion by 8-(N,N-diethylamino) octyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate (TMB-8; 0.25-4 microM) and leupepetin (2-300 microM), and by n-alpha-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethylketone (TLCK; 100 microM) and trifluoperazine (TFP; 2.5 microM). Addition of PDGF to vascular smooth muscle cells caused a rapid, transient increase in cytosolic free calcium, from a basal resting level of 146 +/- 6.9 nM (SEM, n = 62) to 414 +/- 34 nM (SEM, n = 22) as determined using the calcium-sensitive indicator Fura-2 and Digitized Video Microscopy. This increase in cellular calcium preceded the disappearance of vinculin from adhesion plaques and was partially blocked by pretreatment of cells with TMB-8 but not leupeptin. This rise in cytosolic free calcium was found to occur in approximately 80% of the sample population and displayed both spatial and temporal subcellular heterogeneity. Exposure of cells to TPA (100 nM) did not result in a change in cytosolic free calcium. Both PDGF (20 ng/ml) and TPA (100 nM) caused cytosolic alkalinization which occurred after PDGF-induced disruption of vinculin from adhesion plaques, as determined using the pH-sensitive indicator BCECF and Digitized Video Microscopy. PDGF stimulated DNA synthesis and vinculin disruption in a similar dose-dependent fashion. Both could be inhibited by leupeptin or TMB-8. These results suggest that 1) exposure of vascular smooth muscle cells to PDGF is associated with the disruption of vinculin from adhesion plaques, 2) PDGF-induced vinculin disruption is regulated by an increase in cytosolic calcium (but not cytosolic alkalinization), and involves proteolysis; 3) activation of protein kinase C also causes vinculin removal from adhesion plaques but by a calcium-independent mechanism, and 4) the cellular response to PDGF-stimulated increases in cytosolic free calcium is heterogeneous.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS).

PMID:
3121190
DOI:
10.1002/cm.970080202
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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