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Diabetes Metab J. 2019 Jun;43(3):319-341. doi: 10.4093/dmj.2018.0060.

Diabetes Mellitus and Cause-Specific Mortality: A Population-Based Study.

Li S#1,2, Wang J#1, Zhang B3, Li X4, Liu Y5.

Author information

1
School of Life Sciences, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China.
2
Department of Physiology, LKS Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. senli@connect.hku.hk.
3
Department of Epidemiology and Statistics, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.
4
School of Management, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China.
5
Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To investigate whether diabetes contributes to mortality for major types of diseases.

METHODS:

Six National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data cycles (1999 to 2000, 2001 to 2002, 2003 to 2004, 2005 to 2006, 2007 to 2008, and 2009 to 2010) and their linked mortality files were used. A population of 15,513 participants was included according to the availability of diabetes and mortality status.

RESULTS:

Participants with diabetes tended to have higher all-cause mortality and mortality due to cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic lower respiratory diseases, cerebrovascular disease, influenza and pneumonia, and kidney disease. Confounder-adjusted Cox proportional hazard models showed that both diagnosed diabetes category (yes or no) and diabetes status (diabetes, prediabetes, or no diabetes) were associated with all-cause mortality and with mortality due to cardiovascular disease, chronic lower respiratory diseases, influenza and pneumonia, and kidney disease. No associations were found for cancer-, accidents-, or Alzheimer's disease-related mortality.

CONCLUSION:

The current study's findings provide epidemiological evidence that diagnosed diabetes at the baseline is associated with increased mortality risk due to cardiovascular disease, chronic lower respiratory diseases, influenza and pneumonia, and kidney disease, but not with cancer or Alzheimer's disease.

KEYWORDS:

Diabetes complications; Diabetes mellitus; Mortality

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