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J Tissue Eng. 2019 May 19;10:2041731419845849. doi: 10.1177/2041731419845849. eCollection 2019 Jan-Dec.

Bioprinting of three-dimensional dentin-pulp complex with local differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells.

Author information

1
Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan, South Korea.
2
Department of Oral Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Yangsan, South Korea.
3
Institute of Translational Dental Sciences, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Yangsan, South Korea.
4
Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering (ITREN), Dankook University, Cheonan, South Korea.
5
College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan, South Korea.

Abstract

Numerous approaches have been introduced to regenerate artificial dental tissues. However, conventional approaches are limited when producing a construct with three-dimensional patient-specific shapes and compositions of heterogeneous dental tissue. In this research, bioprinting technology was applied to produce a three-dimensional dentin-pulp complex with patient-specific shapes by inducing localized differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells within a single structure. A fibrin-based bio-ink was designed for bioprinting with the human dental pulp stem cells. The effects of fibrinogen concentration within the bio-ink were investigated in terms of printability, human dental pulp stem cell compatibility, and differentiation. The results show that micro-patterns with human dental pulp stem cells could be achieved with more than 88% viability. Its odontogenic differentiation was also regulated according to the fibrinogen concentration. Based on these results, a dentin-pulp complex having patient-specific shape was produced by co-printing the human dental pulp stem cell-laden bio-inks with polycaprolactone, which is a bio-thermoplastic used for producing the overall shape. After culturing with differentiation medium for 15 days, localized differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells in the outer region of the three-dimensional cellular construct was successfully achieved with localized mineralization. This result demonstrates the possibility to produce patient-specific composite tissues for tooth tissue engineering using three-dimensional bioprinting technology.

KEYWORDS:

Bioprinting; cell differentiation; dental pulp; dentin; stem cells; tissue engineering

Conflict of interest statement

Declaration of conflicting interests: The author(s) declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article.

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