Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eur J Nutr. 2019 Jun 13. doi: 10.1007/s00394-019-02006-4. [Epub ahead of print]

Effects of a formula with a probiotic Bifidobacterium lactis Supplement on the gut microbiota of low birth weight infants.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, 100026, China.
2
College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing, 100083, China.
3
Department of Central Laboratory, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, 100026, China.
4
CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing, 100101, China.
5
Department of Neonatology, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, 100026, China.
6
Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD, 4222, Australia.
7
CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing, 100101, China. zhubaoli@im.ac.cn.
8
School of Medicine, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD, 4222, Australia. j.sun@griffith.edu.au.
9
Department of Internal Medicine, Beijing Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, 100026, China. modscn@126.com.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Low birth weight (LBW) infants have a less diverse gut microbiota, enriched in potential pathogens, which places them at high risk of systemic inflammation diseases. This study aimed to identify the differences in gut bacterial community structure between LBW infants who received probiotics and LBW infants who did not receive probiotics.

METHODS:

Forty-one infants were allocated to the non-probiotic group (N group) and 56 infants to the probiotic group (P group), according to whether the formula they received contained a probiotic Bifidobacterium lactis. Gut bacterial composition was identified with sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene in fecal samples collected at 14 days after birth.

RESULTS:

There was no significant difference between the alpha diversity of the two groups, while the beta diversity was significantly different (p < 0.05). Our results showed that Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus (both p < 0.05) were enriched in the P group, while Veillonella, Dolosigranulum and Clostridium sensu stricto 1 (all p < 0.05) were enriched in the N group. Predicted metagenome function analysis revealed enhancement of fatty acids, peroxisome, starch, alanine, tyrosine and peroxisome pathways in the P group, and enhancement of plant pathogen, Salmonella and Helicobacter pylori infection pathways in the N group.

CONCLUSIONS:

Probiotic supplement in formula may affect the composition, stability and function of LBW infants' gut microbiota. LBW infants who receive probiotic intervention may benefit from gut microbiota that contains more beneficial bacteria.

KEYWORDS:

Gut microbiota; Low birth weight infant; Metagenome function analysis; Probiotics

PMID:
31197506
DOI:
10.1007/s00394-019-02006-4

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center