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J Public Health (Oxf). 2019 Jun 14. pii: fdz065. doi: 10.1093/pubmed/fdz065. [Epub ahead of print]

Hispanic adults' physical activity and sedentary behavior profiles: examining existing data to drive prospective research.

Author information

1
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Health Disparities Research, 1400 Pressler, Suite FCT9.6073, Houston, TX, USA.
2
McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Clinical and Translational Sciences; Houston, TX, USA.
3
The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, School of Public Health, Brownsville Regional Campus, Department of Health Promotion and Behavioral Sciences; Brownsville, TX, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Because physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) are two distinct, interdependent behaviors, increases in PA may influence SB. As a limited number of SB interventions have been tested in Latino/Hispanic samples,. The purpose of this study is to assess if there was more PA and less SB in a Hispanic border community where there had been a PA-targeted community-wide campaign since 2005.

METHODS:

This cross-sectional study included Hispanic adults (N = 676) sampled from both intervention and comparison Texas-Mexico border communities in 2010. Our dependent variable was four-categories based on meeting PA guidelines and excessive SB (≥540 mins/day) cut-points. We conducted adjusted multivariable analysis to assess the association of intervention group with the PA/SB groupings.

RESULTS:

In 2010, most adults were in the Low PA/Low SB group. Compared to the comparison group, the intervention group had 6.45 (p < 0.001) times the adjusted odds of being in the High PA/Low SB vs. Low PA/High SB group.

CONCLUSIONS:

Five years into the campaign, more PA and less SB were more likely in the intervention community, indicating the association of some PA interventions with SB. PA-targeted interventions should capture effects on SB to expand the literature on effective SB interventions for Hispanic adults.

KEYWORDS:

health promotion; individual behaviour; physical activity

PMID:
31197352
DOI:
10.1093/pubmed/fdz065

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