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Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol. 2019 May 9;12:347-354. doi: 10.2147/CCID.S198577. eCollection 2019.

Impact of olive oil and honey on healing of diabetic foot: a randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
Department of Operating Room, School of Paramedicine, Yasuj University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Iran.
2
Deputy Education School of Paramedicine, Yasuj University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Iran.
3
Medicinal Plants Research Center, Yasuj University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Iran.
4
Center of Disease Registry, Yasuj University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Iran.
5
Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran.
6
Department of Critical Care Nursing, Yasuj University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Iran.
7
School of Paramedicine, Yasuj University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Iran.
8
Department of Nursing, Yasuj University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Iran.
9
Department of Pharmacology, Yasuj University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Iran.
10
Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Yasuj University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Iran.

Abstract

Background: This study aimed 1) to examine the impact of honey on diabetic foot; 2) to examine the effect of olive oil on diabetic foot; and 3) to compare the impact of honey and olive oil in the healing of diabetic foot. Methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 45 patients took part. Patients were randomly assigned to three groups. In the honey group, the wound was dressed using gauzes with honey daily for 1 month. In the olive oil group, the wound was dressed using gauzes with olive oil (4 mL) daily for 1 month. Patients in the control group received usual dressing. Wounds were assessed before and after intervention using the Wagner scoring system and the checklist of diabetic foot healing (where a higher score indicates better wound healing). Results: Demographic characteristics of patients in the three groups were similar. Mean scores of tissue around the wound, wound grade, wound drainage, and wound healing were similar before intervention in all three groups. After intervention, means score of tissue around the wound, wound grade, wound drainage, and wound healing were significantly higher in patients in the honey and olive oil groups compared to patients in the control group. Conclusion: The results of this study reveal that honey is as effective as olive oil in the treatment of diabetic foot. Given the few studies on this topic, further investigation is needed.

KEYWORDS:

therapeutic use; foot ulcer; honey; olive oil

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