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Ann Surg Oncol. 2019 Jun 12. doi: 10.1245/s10434-019-07507-4. [Epub ahead of print]

Obstruction-Free Survival Following Operative Intervention for Malignant Bowel Obstruction in Appendiceal Cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, University of California, San Diego Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA, USA. j1baumgartner@ucsd.edu.
2
Department of Surgery, University of California, San Diego Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Patients with peritoneal metastases from appendiceal cancer are at high risk of malignant bowel obstruction (MBO), which is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. There are no definitive treatment guidelines regarding operative intervention for MBO. We sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of operative intervention in this population.

METHODS:

We identified patients with peritoneal metastases from appendiceal cancer who underwent surgery for MBO at our institution between 2011 and 2018. Baseline characteristics, postoperative complications, and follow-up data were collected. The primary endpoint was obstruction-free survival (OFS). Other endpoints were postoperative recovery of bowel function, 60-day Clavien-Dindo (CD) morbidity, and overall survival (OS).

RESULTS:

Twenty-six patients underwent operative treatment for MBO, of whom 14 had high-grade (HG) histology and 12 had low-grade (LG) histology. Seven (25.9%) patients had severe (CD grade 3 or higher) 60-day complications, including one (3.8%) postoperative death. All remaining patients had return of bowel function and resumed oral intake during hospitalization. Six (23.1%) patients had repeat admissions for MBO after surgery. Median OFS was 17.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.3-31.8), and median OS was 18.5 months (95% CI 3.6-33.3) following surgery.

CONCLUSION:

In this carefully selected group of patients with peritoneal metastases from appendiceal cancer, surgery for MBO provided durable palliation with acceptable morbidity.

PMID:
31190209
DOI:
10.1245/s10434-019-07507-4

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