Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Fam Med. 2019 Jun;51(6):509-515. doi: 10.22454/FamMed.2019.168353.

Residency Faculty Teaching Evaluation: What Do Faculty, Residents, and Program Directors Want?

Author information

1
Department of Family Medicine,University of North Carolina Chapel Hill.
2
University of North Carolina Department of Family Medicine.
3
Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill.
4
Department of Family Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA.
5
Department of Family Medicine, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Common Residency Program Requirements stipulate that each faculty member's performance be evaluated annually. Feedback is essential to this process, yet the culture of medicine poses challenges to developing effective feedback systems. The current study explores existing and ideal characteristics of faculty teaching evaluation systems from the perspectives of key stakeholders: faculty, residents, and residency program directors (PDs).

METHODS:

We utilized two qualitative approaches: (1) confidential semistructured telephone interviews with PDs from a convenience sample of eight family medicine residency programs, (2) qualitative responses from an anonymous online survey of faculty and residents in the same eight programs. We used inductive thematic analysis to analyze the interviews and survey responses. Data collection occurred in the fall of 2017.

RESULTS:

All eight (100%) of the PDs completed interviews. Survey response rates for faculty and residents were 79% (99/126) and 70% (152/216), respectively. Both PD and faculty responses identified a desire for actionable, real-time, frequent feedback used to foster continued professional development. Themes unique to faculty included easy accessibility and feedback from peers. Residents expressed an interest in in-person feedback and a process minimizing potential retribution. Residents indicated that feedback should be based on shared understanding of what skill(s) the faculty member is trying to address.

CONCLUSIONS:

PDs, faculty, and residents share a desire to provide faculty with meaningful, specific, and real-time feedback. Programs should strive to provide a culture in which feedback is an integral part of the learning process for both residents and faculty.

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center