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Pediatr Obes. 2019 Jun 11:e12541. doi: 10.1111/ijpo.12541. [Epub ahead of print]

Maternal nicotine dependence is associated with longitudinal increases in child obesogenic eating behaviors.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.
2
Center for Human Growth and Development, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.
3
School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.
4
Department of Pediatrics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Meta-analysis shows that parental cigarette smoking is associated with child obesity.

OBJECTIVES:

This study tested for associations between severity of maternal nicotine dependence and longitudinal changes in child eating behavior in archival data analysis.

METHODS:

Maternal nicotine dependence was assessed with the Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence. Child eating behavior was assessed with the Child Eating Behavior Questionnaire when children were ages 4, 6, 8, and 10.

RESULTS:

Over and above the influence of child age, child biological sex, and family income-to-needs ratio, more severe maternal nicotine dependence was associated with greater increases in child Food Responsiveness (γ = 0.07, SEγ  = 0.03, P = .014, 95% CI [0.01, 0.13]) and Emotional Overeating (γ = 0.06, SEγ  = 0.03, P = .024, 95% CI [0.01, 0.11]) across 6 years.

CONCLUSIONS:

Maternal nicotine dependence may be a transdiagnostic risk factor that identifies children at risk for reward-driven, obesogenic eating behavior.

KEYWORDS:

Childhood; eating behavior; longitudinal; parental nicotine dependence

PMID:
31184441
DOI:
10.1111/ijpo.12541

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