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Nanoscale. 2019 Jun 11. doi: 10.1039/c9nr01688k. [Epub ahead of print]

Development of an image biosensor based on an optogenetically engineered cell for visual prostheses.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, China. lqliu@sia.cn wangwenxue@sia.cn and Institutes for Robotics and Intelligent Manufacturing, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, China and Key Laboratory of Advanced Process Control for Light Industry (Ministry of Education), Institute of Automation, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122, China.
2
Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA.
3
School of Electromechanical and Automotive Engineering, Yantai University, Yantai 264005, China.
4
State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, China. lqliu@sia.cn wangwenxue@sia.cn and Institutes for Robotics and Intelligent Manufacturing, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, China and University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China.
5
State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, China. lqliu@sia.cn wangwenxue@sia.cn and Institutes for Robotics and Intelligent Manufacturing, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, China.

Abstract

Visual prostheses provide blind patients with artificial vision via electrical stimulation of surviving visual cells resulting in partial restoration of vision in many patients. However, high-resolution visual perception, long-term biocompatibility and safety remain the significant challenges of existing visual prostheses. Here, we present a novel method to develop a new visual prosthesis using living cells as integrated electronics and implantable microelectrodes. The living cells modified with channelrhodopsin-2 showed excellent light-sensitive properties and encoded image information with cellular deformations triggered by light stimulation. The photoresponsive properties of the cells were determined using a single pixel imaging system, which indicated that the cells can act as a good light-sensitive biosensor. Additionally, the imaging feasibility of the cells was further validated through successful and clear imaging of several object scenes using the same system. This work represents a step toward the design and use of living cells as an image biosensor for the development of a new generation of high-resolution visual prostheses.

PMID:
31184360
DOI:
10.1039/c9nr01688k

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