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Nat Neurosci. 2019 Jul;22(7):1057-1060. doi: 10.1038/s41593-019-0410-7. Epub 2019 Jun 10.

Divergence in the functional organization of human and macaque auditory cortex revealed by fMRI responses to harmonic tones.

Author information

1
Zuckerman Institute for Mind, Brain and Behavior, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. sn2776@columbia.edu.
2
Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA. sn2776@columbia.edu.
3
HHMI Postdoctoral Fellow of the Life Sciences Research Institute, Chevy Chase, MD, USA. sn2776@columbia.edu.
4
Laboratoire des Systèmes Perceptifs, Département d'Études Cognitives, École Normale Supérieure, PSL University, CNRS, Paris, France. sn2776@columbia.edu.
5
Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA.
6
McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Cambridge, MA, USA.
7
Center for Minds, Brains and Machines, Cambridge, MA, USA.
8
Program in Speech and Hearing Biosciences and Technology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA.
9
Laboratory of Sensorimotor Research, NEI, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA. bevil@nih.gov.
10
National Institute of Mental Health, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA. bevil@nih.gov.
11
National Institute of Neurological Disease and Stroke, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA. bevil@nih.gov.

Abstract

We report a difference between humans and macaque monkeys in the functional organization of cortical regions implicated in pitch perception. Humans but not macaques showed regions with a strong preference for harmonic sounds compared to noise, measured with both synthetic tones and macaque vocalizations. In contrast, frequency-selective tonotopic maps were similar between the two species. This species difference may be driven by the unique demands of speech and music perception in humans.

PMID:
31182868
PMCID:
PMC6592717
[Available on 2019-12-10]
DOI:
10.1038/s41593-019-0410-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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