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J Orthop Surg Res. 2019 Jun 10;14(1):174. doi: 10.1186/s13018-019-1212-z.

Predictors of safety margin for coracoid transfer: a cadaveric morphometric analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Fukuoka University Faculty of Medicine, 7-45-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka, 814-0180, Japan. teru-sky-ideal@lion.ocn.ne.jp.
2
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Fukuoka University Faculty of Medicine, 7-45-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka, 814-0180, Japan.
3
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Fukuoka University Chikushi Hospital, 1-1-1 Zokumyoin, Chikushino, Fukuoka, 818-8502, Japan.
4
Department of Anatomy, Fukuoka University Faculty of Medicine, 7-45-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka, 814-0180, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the bone length available for coracoid transfer without coracoclavicular ligament injury and the distance from the coracoid tip to the attachments of the coracoacromial ligament or pectoralis minor. We hypothesized that cadaver height and the soft tissue attachments on the coracoid process were predictive factors for sufficient bone length for coracoid transfer.

METHODS:

This study included 28 shoulders from Japanese cadavers: 19 male and 9 female. The distance from the coracoid tip to the distal attachment of the coracoclavicular ligament and the anterior and posterior margins of the coracoacromial ligament or pectoralis minor on the coracoid process were measured.

RESULTS:

The mean available length for coracoid transfer was 24.8 ± 3.4 mm. There was a significant difference in length between male and female subjects, being 26.0 ± 2.9 mm and 22.2 ± 3.0 mm, respectively (p = 0.004). High positive correlations were found between the length of the coracoid transfer and cadaver's height (r = 0.48, p = 0.009) and the distance from the coracoid tip to the anterior coracoacromial ligament attachment (r = 0.63, p < 0.001). The receiver operating characteristic curve area under the curve for cadaver height was 0.72 while that for distance from coracoid tip to anterior coracoacromial ligament was 0.88 when predicted for a sufficient length for coracoid transfer > 25 mm.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings will aid surgeons in preoperative planning and performing of osteotomy of the coracoid safely by predicting the available length of coracoid bone graft.

KEYWORDS:

Anatomy; Coracoacromial ligament; Coracoid; Coracoid transfer; Height; Latarjet

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