Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Hematol Oncol. 2019 Jun 10;12(1):58. doi: 10.1186/s13045-019-0743-4.

Immune checkpoint inhibitors in the treatment of virus-associated cancers.

Gao P1, Lazare C1, Cao C1, Meng Y1, Wu P1, Zhi W1, Lin S1, Wei J1,2, Huang X1,2, Xi L1,2, Chen G1,2, Hu J2, Ma D3,4, Wu P5,6.

Author information

1
Cancer Biology Research Center (Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education), Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China.
2
Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China.
3
Cancer Biology Research Center (Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education), Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China. dma@tjh.tjmu.edu.cn.
4
Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China. dma@tjh.tjmu.edu.cn.
5
Cancer Biology Research Center (Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education), Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China. pengwu8626@tjh.tjmu.edu.cn.
6
Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China. pengwu8626@tjh.tjmu.edu.cn.

Abstract

Among all malignant tumors that threaten human health, virus-related tumors account for a large proportion. The treatment of these tumors is still an urgent problem to be resolved. The immune system is the "guard" of the human body, resisting the invasion of foreign substances such as viruses. Studies have shown that immunotherapy has clinical significance in the treatment of a variety of tumors. In particular, the emergence of immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) in recent years has opened a new door to cancer therapy. Considering the potential role of ICIs in the treatment of virus-related cancers, we focused on their therapeutic effect in virus-associated cancers and explored whether the therapeutic effect in virus-associated cancers was related to virus infection status. Although there is no clear statistical significance indicates that ICIs are more effective in virus-associated cancers than non-virus infections, the efficacy of checkpoint inhibitors in the treatment of virus-related cancers is promising. We believe that this research provides a good direction for the implementation of individualized precision medicine.

KEYWORDS:

Immune checkpoint inhibitors; Immunotherapy; Virus-associated cancers

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center