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J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2019 Jun 7. pii: S0884-2175(19)30368-5. doi: 10.1016/j.jogn.2019.05.003. [Epub ahead of print]

Randomized Controlled Trial of Motivational Interviewing to Support Breastfeeding Among Appalachian Women.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the effectiveness of a single session of prenatal motivational interviewing (MI) to enhance breastfeeding outcomes.

DESIGN:

A randomized controlled trial with two groups (MI and psychoeducation) with repeated measures: preintervention, postintervention, and at 1 month postpartum.

SETTING:

The intervention was conducted at a university-associated clinic, community locations, and participants' homes. Postpartum follow-up was conducted by telephone.

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 81 women with low-risk pregnancies enrolled at 28 to 39 weeks gestation who lived in Appalachia.

METHODS:

Participants were randomly assigned to MI or psychoeducation on infant development. Pre- and postintervention outcome measures included intention to breastfeed, confidence in and importance of breastfeeding plan, and breastfeeding attitudes. At 1 month postpartum, participants completed a telephone interview to assess actual breastfeeding initiation, exclusivity, and plans to continue breastfeeding.

RESULTS:

At 1 month postpartum, women in the MI group were more likely to report any current breastfeeding than women in the psychoeducation group, regardless of parity, χ2(1, N = 79) = 4.30, p = 0.040, Φ = .233. At the postintervention time point, the MI intervention had a significant effect on improving attitudes about breastfeeding among primiparous women only (p < .05).

CONCLUSION:

One session of MI was effective to promote breastfeeding at 1 month postpartum and to enhance positive attitudes toward breastfeeding among primiparous women in Appalachia.

KEYWORDS:

Appalachia; breastfeeding; lactation; motivational interviewing; prenatal

PMID:
31181186
DOI:
10.1016/j.jogn.2019.05.003

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