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Mar Pollut Bull. 2019 Jul;144:152-159. doi: 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2019.05.006. Epub 2019 May 16.

Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope signatures linked to anthropogenic toxic substances pollution in a highly industrialized area of South Korea.

Author information

1
Department of Ocean Environmental Sciences, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 34134, Republic of Korea.
2
Marine Ecosystem Research Center, Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, Busan 49111, Republic of Korea.
3
School of Earth and Environmental Sciences & Research Institute of Oceanography, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Republic of Korea.
4
Department of Marine Science and Convergence Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan 15588, Republic of Korea.
5
Department of Environment & Energy, Sejong University, Seoul 05006, Republic of Korea.
6
School of Earth and Environmental Sciences & Research Institute of Oceanography, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: jskocean@snu.ac.kr.
7
Department of Marine Science and Convergence Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan 15588, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: shinkh@hanyang.ac.kr.

Abstract

Sources of organic matter in a polluted coastal embayment (Lake Sihwa) indicated that δ13C and δ15N of suspended particulate matter (SPM) and sediments could be distinguished by land-use type and surrounding activities. Specifically, low δ15N occurred in inland creeks near industrial complex, where severe contamination by persistent toxic substances (PTSs) is evidenced. To identify the sources of 15N-depleted organic matter and PTSs, the SPM and/or sediments were collected along ~8 km of the Singil Creek and in stormwater drainage pipes that carried pollutants to the creeks from upland areas. Results indicated that stormwater originating in industrial areas was the main source of low δ15N and elevated PTSs, which appeared to flow into stormwater drains with rainwater and eventually into the creeks at stormwater outfalls. To improve the water quality of inland creeks, it will be necessary to reduce the amount of untreated stormwater entering stormwater drainage system from industrial complex.

KEYWORDS:

AhR activity; Alkylphenols; PAHs; Sediments; Source identification; Styrene oligomers

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