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J Restor Med. 2019;8(1). pii: e20190107. doi: 10.14200/jrm.2019.0107. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Effect of the Anti-Inflammatory Diet in People with Diabetes and Pre-Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Feeding Study.

Author information

1
Helfgott Research Institute, National University of Natural Medicine, Portland, OR, USA.
2
Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA.
3
University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA.

Abstract

Introduction:

Inflammation underlies a variety of chronic medical conditions, including diabetes. The anti-inflammatory diet, one that excludes foods that may stimulate inflammation and includes foods that reduce inflammation, may improve inflammatory biomarkers in people with diabetes and pre-diabetes.

Study Design:

Thirty participants with diabetes or pre-diabetes were randomized (2:1) in a controlled feeding study that compared the anti-inflammatory diet (n=20) to a control diet (n=10) based on the American Diabetes Association recommendations. Diets were matched for protein, carbohydrate, fat, and fiber content as closely as possible. Participants were fed an isocaloric diet for 2 weeks, followed by continued ad libitum feeding in their dietary group assignment for an additional 4 weeks. All meals were prepared by the study team.

Outcomes:

Primary outcomes included inflammatory markers, including cytokines and hsCRP. Secondary outcomes included body weight and biomarkers for cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

Results:

Both diets resulted in trends in reduced markers of inflammation, especially with weight loss. In addition, glucose, lipids, and triglycerides all trended downward, also non-significantly and equally in both groups.

Conclusion:

Dietary change can improve inflammation as well as other cardiometabolic risk factors. In this study, the anti-inflammatory diet did not affect markers of inflammation more than the control diet.

KEYWORDS:

Anti-inflammatory diet; cytokines and diet; pre-diabetic diet; weight loss

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