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Cortex. 2019 May 9;119:301-311. doi: 10.1016/j.cortex.2019.04.022. [Epub ahead of print]

Prism adaptation effect on neural activity and spatial neglect depend on brain lesion site.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Geneva University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine University of Geneva, Switzerland; Department of Psychology, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland; Department of Psychology, University of Montréal, Canada. Electronic address: arnaud.saj@unige.ch.
2
Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Geneva University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine University of Geneva, Switzerland.
3
Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Geneva University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine University of Geneva, Switzerland; Department of Fundamental Neurosciences, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
4
Department of Fundamental Neurosciences, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.

Abstract

Prism adaptation (PA) is one of the few rehabilitation techniques for spatial neglect that directly targets physiological mechanisms underlying space representation, but its efficacy and neural mechanisms remain unresolved. Using PA and fMRI in patients with spatial neglect after an acute right-hemispheric stroke, we previously observed post-PA increases in activity in bilateral parietal, frontal, and occipital cortex during specific visuo-spatial tasks (bisection and visual search). However, given a key role of parietal areas for PA in healthy individuals, we hypothesized that such activation might differ according to the site of brain damage. We studied a group of 10 patients with focal right hemisphere stroke and spatial neglect at baseline and after PA, who were divided in two groups (5 patients with frontal and 5 patients with parietal strokes). We compared their behavioural performance and brain activation patterns during fMRI. At the behavioural level, frontal and parietal patients showed similar neglect signs on visuo-spatial tasks before PA, but frontal patients showed larger benefit from PA. Differences were also observed in cortical activity, with enhanced recruitment of right parietal areas in frontal patients and less consistent patterns in parietal patients. Furthermore, fMRI analysis during PA itself (divided in 5 successive periods) showed differential activations between group in anatomically preserved pathways, including occipital areas and cerebellum, that preceded changes in parietal areas and were specific to frontal patients. These data accord with the hypothesis that intact cerebello-parietal connections may underpin improvement of spatial neglect after PA. Altogether, these results provide important insights on brain networks involved in spatial cognition and may allow an optimal selection of patients benefiting from PA after right hemispheric stroke.

KEYWORDS:

Frontal lobe; Parietal lobe; Prism adaptation; Spatial neglect; fMRI

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