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Adv Drug Deliv Rev. 2019 Jun 6. pii: S0169-409X(19)30063-8. doi: 10.1016/j.addr.2019.06.001. [Epub ahead of print]

Electrically conductive nanomaterials for cardiac tissue engineering.

Author information

1
Radiation Biology Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Faculty of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Department of Medical Nanotechnology, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
2
Faculty of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Department of Medical Nanotechnology, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Stem Cell Technology Research Center, Tehran, Iran.
3
Center for Minimally Invasive Therapeutics (C-MIT), University of California - Los Angeles, Los Angeles, USA; Department of Bioengineering, University of California - Los Angeles, Los Angeles, USA.
4
Faculty of Forestry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; Center for Biocomposites and Biomaterials Processing (CBBP), University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; Shahdad Ronak Commercialization Company, Tehran, Iran.
5
Laboratory for Innovations in MicroEngineering (LiME), Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Victoria, Victoria, Canada; Center for Biomedical Research, University of Victoria, Victoria, Canada; Center for Advanced Materials and Related Technologies, University of Victoria, Victoria, Canada.
6
Biomaterials Group, Department of Biomaterial Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran; Stem Cell Technology Research Center, Tehran, Iran.
7
Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Canada; Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
8
Faculty of Medical Sciences, Department of Hematology and Cell Therapy, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran.
9
Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California - Los Angeles, USA.
10
School of Biomedical Engineering, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia; Institute of Molecular Medicine, Sechenov University, Moscow, Russia.
11
Center for Minimally Invasive Therapeutics (C-MIT), University of California - Los Angeles, Los Angeles, USA; Department of Bioengineering, University of California - Los Angeles, Los Angeles, USA; Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California - Los Angeles, Los Angeles, USA; Department of Radiology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California - Los Angeles, Los Angeles, USA. Electronic address: khademh@ucla.edu.

Abstract

Patient deaths resulting from cardiovascular diseases are increasing across the globe, posing the greatest risk to patients in developed countries. Myocardial infarction, as a result of inadequate blood flow to the myocardium, results in irreversible loss of cardiomyocytes which can lead to heart failure. A sequela of myocardial infarction is scar formation that can alter the normal myocardial architecture and result in arrhythmias. Over the past decade, a myriad of tissue engineering approaches has been developed to fabricate engineered scaffolds for repairing cardiac tissue. This paper highlights the recent application of electrically conductive nanomaterials (carbon and gold-based nanomaterials, and electroactive polymers) to the development of scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering. Moreover, this work summarizes the effects of these nanomaterials on cardiac cell behavior such as proliferation and migration, as well as cardiomyogenic differentiation in stem cells.

KEYWORDS:

Carbon-based nanomaterials; Cardiac tissue engineering; Cardiovascular diseases; Conductive nanomaterials; Electrically conductive scaffolds; Electroactive polymers; Gold nanoparticles

PMID:
31176755
DOI:
10.1016/j.addr.2019.06.001

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