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Vet Microbiol. 2019 Jun;233:147-153. doi: 10.1016/j.vetmic.2019.04.029. Epub 2019 Apr 26.

ATN-161 reduces virus proliferation in PHEV-infected mice by inhibiting the integrin α5β1-FAK signaling pathway.

Author information

1
Key Laboratory of Zoonosis Research, Ministry of Education, College of Veterinary Medicine, Jilin University, Changchun 130062, China.
2
Department of Neurosurgery, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, 130021, China.
3
Key Laboratory of Zoonosis Research, Ministry of Education, Institute of Zoonosis, Jilin University, Changchun 130062, China.
4
Key Laboratory of Zoonosis Research, Ministry of Education, College of Veterinary Medicine, Jilin University, Changchun 130062, China. Electronic address: gaofeng@jlu.edu.cn.

Abstract

Porcine hemagglutinating encephalomyelitis virus (PHEV) is a typical neurotropic virus that can cause obvious nerve damage. Integrin α5β1 is a transmembrane macromolecular that closely related to neurological function. We recently demonstrated that integrin α5β1 plays a critical role in PHEV invasion in vitro. To determine the function and mechanism of integrin α5β1 in virus proliferation in vivo, we established a mouse model of PHEV infection. Integrin α5β1-FAK signaling pathway was activated in PHEV-infected mice by qPCR, Western blotting, and GST pull-down assays. Viral proliferation and integrin α5β1-FAK signaling pathway were significantly inhibited after intravenous injection of ATN-161, an integrin α5β1 inhibitor. Through a histological analysis, we found that ATN-161-treated mice only showed pathological changes in neuronal cytoplasmic swelling at 5 day post-infection. In summary, our results provide the first evidence that ATN-161 inhibits the proliferation of PHEV in mice and explores its underlying mechanisms of action.

KEYWORDS:

ATN-161; FAK; Integrin α5β1; Porcine hemagglutinating encephalomyelitis virus

PMID:
31176401
DOI:
10.1016/j.vetmic.2019.04.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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