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Int J Infect Dis. 2019 Aug;85:98-107. doi: 10.1016/j.ijid.2019.05.036. Epub 2019 Jun 5.

Antimicrobial resistance in Cambodia: a review.

Author information

1
Cambodia-Oxford Medical Research Unit, Angkor Hospital for Children, Siem Reap, Cambodia.
2
Department of Communicable Diseases Control, Ministry of Health, Phnom Penh, Cambodia.
3
Diagnostic Microbiology Development Program, Phnom Penh, Cambodia.
4
United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Phnom Penh, Cambodia.
5
Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations, Phnom Penh, Cambodia.
6
Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Health Sciences, Phnom Penh, Cambodia.
7
Fondation Mérieux, Phnom Penh, Cambodia.
8
World Health Organization, Phnom Penh, Cambodia.
9
National Institute of Public Health, Phnom Penh, Cambodia.
10
Sihanouk Hospital Center of Hope, Phnom Penh, Cambodia.
11
Institut Pasteur du Cambodge, Phnom Penh, Cambodia.
12
Cambodia-Oxford Medical Research Unit, Angkor Hospital for Children, Siem Reap, Cambodia; Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. Electronic address: pault@tropmedres.ac.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Following the launch of the Global Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System (GLASS), antimicrobial resistance (AMR) rates in many countries remain poorly described. This review provides an overview of published AMR data from Cambodia in the context of recently initiated national human and food-animal surveillance.

METHODS:

PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched for articles published from 2000 to 2018, which reported antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) data for GLASS specific organisms isolated from Cambodia. Articles were screened using strict inclusion/exclusion criteria. AST data was extracted, with medians and ranges of resistance rates calculated for specific bug-drug combinations.

RESULTS:

Twenty-four papers were included for final analysis, with 20 describing isolates from human populations. Escherichia coli was the most commonly described organism, with median resistance rates from human isolates of 92.8% (n=6 articles), 46.4% (n=4), 55.4% (n=8), and 46.4% (n=5) to ampicillin, 3rd generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, and gentamicin respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Whilst resistance rates are high for several GLASS organisms, there were insufficient data to draw robust conclusions about the AMR situation in Cambodia. The recently implemented national AMR surveillance systems will begin to address this data gap.

KEYWORDS:

Antimicrobial resistance; Bacteria; Cambodia; One Health; Review

PMID:
31176035
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijid.2019.05.036
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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