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Prev Med. 2019 Sep;126:105744. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2019.06.002. Epub 2019 Jun 4.

Clean indoor air laws, cigarette excise taxes, and smoking: Results from the current population survey-tobacco use supplement, 2003-2011.

Author information

1
Department of Mental Health, Hampton House, 624 North Broadway, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States.
2
Department of Health, Behavior and Society, Hampton House, 624 North Broadway, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States; Institute for Global Tobacco Control, 2213 McElderry Street, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States.
3
Center for Drug Safety and Effectiveness, 615 North Wolfe Street, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States; Department of Epidemiology, 615 North Wolfe Street, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States; Division of General Internal Medicine, 1800 Orleans Street, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD, United States.
4
Department of Health Policy and Management, Hampton House, 624 North Broadway, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States. Electronic address: lrutkow@jhu.edu.

Abstract

There was an increase in the number and coverage of state and local clean indoor air laws in the US during the past fifteen years. These laws coincided with increases in federal, state, and local cigarette excise taxes. In light of these changes, the objective of this study was to examine the association between clean indoor air laws, cigarette excise taxes and smoking patterns between 2003 and 2011. Using data on 62,165 adult participants in the 2003 and 2010/2011 Current Population Survey-Tobacco Use Supplement who reported smoking cigarettes in the past year, we examined the association of state and county workplace, bar, and restaurant clean indoor air laws and cigarette excise taxes with quitting and current every-day smoking. Between 2003 and 2011, quitting increased and daily smoking among those who continued to smoke decreased significantly. Participants living in states and counties with higher excise taxes and more comprehensive clean indoor air laws had a higher likelihood of quitting and lower likelihood of everyday smoking. Based on the assumption of no uncontrolled confounding, changes in taxes and laws accounted for 64.8% of the increase in smoking cessation and all of the reduction in everyday smoking. Implementation of state and county-level clean indoor air laws and cigarette taxes appears to have achieved the intended goal of encouraging smokers to either quit or reduce their frequency of smoking.

PMID:
31173803
PMCID:
PMC6697615
[Available on 2020-09-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2019.06.002

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