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J Am Coll Nutr. 2019 Aug;38(6):552-563. doi: 10.1080/07315724.2018.1534620. Epub 2019 Jun 7.

Egg Consumption and Risk of Total and Cause-Specific Mortality: An Individual-Based Cohort Study and Pooling Prospective Studies on Behalf of the Lipid and Blood Pressure Meta-analysis Collaboration (LBPMC) Group.

Author information

1
a Key State Laboratory of Molecular Developmental Biology, Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chaoyang , Beijing , China.
2
b Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, International College, University of Chinese Academy of Science (IC-UCAS) , West Beichen Road , Chaoyang , China.
3
c Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Royal Free Campus, University College London Medical School, University College London , London , UK.
4
d Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke Clinical Research Institute , Durham , North Carolina.
5
e Department of Hypertension, Chair of Nephrology and Hypertension, Medical University of Lodz , Poland.
6
f Polish Mother's Memorial Hospital Research Institute , Lodz , Poland.
7
g Cardiovascular Research Centre, University of Zielona Gora , Zielona Gora , Poland.

Abstract

The associations of egg consumption with total, coronary heart disease (CHD), and stroke mortality are poorly understood. We prospectively evaluated the link between total, CHD, and stroke mortality with egg consumption using a randomly selected sample of U.S. adults. Next we validated these results within a meta-analysis and systematic review of all available prospective results. We assessed the mean of cardiometabolic risk factors across the intake of eggs. We made the analysis based on data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES; 1999-2010). In NHANES, vital status through December 31, 2011, was ascertained. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to relate baseline egg consumption with all-cause and cause-specific mortality. PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases were also searched (up to December 2017). The DerSimonian-Laird method and generic inverse variance methods were used for quantitative data synthesis. Overall, 23,524 participants from NHANES were included (mean age of 47.7 years; 48.7% were men). Across increasing the intake of eggs, adjusted mean levels of cardiometabolic risk factors worsened. Adjusted logistic regression showed that participants in the highest category of egg intake had a greater risk of diabetes (T2DM; 30%) and hypertension (HTN; 48%). With regard to total and CHD mortality, multivariable Cox regression in a fully adjusted model showed no link in males and females. In males, egg intake had a reverse (66%) association with stroke mortality, while this link was not significant among females. The results of pooling data from published prospective studies also showed no link between CHD and total mortality with egg consumption, whereas we observed a reverse (28%) association between egg intake and stroke mortality. These findings were robust after sensitivity analysis. According to our findings, egg intake had no association with CHD and total mortality, whereas was associated with lower risk of mortality from stroke. Egg consumption was associated with T2DM, HTN, C-reactive protein, and markers of glucose/insulin homeostasis. If confirmed in clinical trials (causation), this information may have applications for population-wide health measures. Key teaching points No link between total and CHD mortality with eggs intake in males and females. In males, egg intake had a reverse association with stroke mortality, while this link was not significant among females. The results of pooling data from published prospective studies also showed no link between CHD and total mortality with egg consumption, whereas we observed a reverse association between egg intake and stroke mortality.

KEYWORDS:

Egg; coronary heart disease; diabetes; hypertension; mortality; stroke

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