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World J Urol. 2019 Jun 6. doi: 10.1007/s00345-019-02838-z. [Epub ahead of print]

Intra- and inter-resting-state networks abnormalities in overactive bladder syndrome patients: an independent component analysis of resting-state fMRI.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital, Capital Medical University, 8 Gongren Tiyuchang Nanlu, Chaoyang District, Beijing, 100020, China.
2
School of Economics and Management, Beihang University, Beijing, China.
3
Department of Radiology, Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital, Capital Medical University, 8 Gongren Tiyuchang Nanlu, Chaoyang District, Beijing, 100020, China. shuangkunwang@126.com.
4
Department of Urology, Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study aims to determine whether intra-network and inter-network brain connectivities are altered using an independent component analysis (ICA).

METHODS:

Resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) data were acquired from 26 patients with OAB and 28 healthy controls (HC). Eleven resting-state networks (RSNs) were identified via ICA. General linear model (GLM) was used to compare intra-network FC and inter-network FC of RSNs between the two groups. Pearson correlation analyses were performed to investigate the relationship between the identified RSNs and clinical variables.

RESULTS:

Compared with HC, the OAB group showed abnormal FC within the sensorimotor-related network (SMN), the dorsal attention network (DAN), the dorsal visual network (dVN), and the left frontoparietal network (LFPN). With respect to inter-network interactions, decreased FC was detected between the SMN and the anterior default mode network (aDMN).

CONCLUSION:

This study demonstrated that abnormal FC between RSNs may reflect the altered resting state of the brain-bladder network. The findings of this study provide complementary evidence that can help further understand the neural substrates of the overactive bladder.

KEYWORDS:

Functional magnetic resonance; Independent component analysis; Overactive bladder syndrome

PMID:
31172280
DOI:
10.1007/s00345-019-02838-z

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