Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Talanta. 2019 Sep 1;202:452-459. doi: 10.1016/j.talanta.2019.04.075. Epub 2019 May 1.

Luminescent carbon nanodots based aptasensors for rapid detection of kanamycin residue.

Author information

1
Department of Chemical Engineering& Pharmaceutical Engineering, College of Chemical Engineering, Huaqiao University, Xiamen, 361021, China. Electronic address: linxuexia@hqu.edu.cn.
2
Department of Chemical Engineering& Pharmaceutical Engineering, College of Chemical Engineering, Huaqiao University, Xiamen, 361021, China.
3
School of Marine Engineering, Jimei University, Xiamen, 361021, China. Electronic address: linhongui36@jmu.edu.cn.
4
College of Materials Science and Engineering, Huaqiao University, Xiamen, 361021, China.

Abstract

Despite the success in long-term storage of food and dietary products using antibiotics as supplements, enormous levels of their residues have remained as a significant health concern, leading to severe toxicity issues on consumption. Herein, we report an ultrasensitive and highly selective aptasensor based on carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) through a fluorescence-based aptamer-linked immunosorbent assay (FALIA) for rapid detection of kanamycin (KAA) residue. The fabricated CNP-aptasensor exhibited superior selectivity with exceptional photoluminescence properties. Under the optimal conditions, the linear equation of standard KAA solution was Y = -0.2279LogX+1.3648 (R = -0.9893) ranged from 10-4 to 10-7 ppb with excellent relative standard deviations (RSD) between 3.12 and 5.59 % (n = 3). Moreover, the limit of detection (LOD) was lower than 5.0 × 10-8 ppb. Together, the excellent recovery and significant efficacy in the rapid detection of antibiotics at a low level in milk indicate that this fabricated CNP-aptasensor has a great potential in the establishment of an efficient antibiotic detector system in food and other nutraceutical industries.

KEYWORDS:

Aptamer; Carbon nanoparticles; Fluorescence-based aptamer linked immunosorbent assay; Kanamycin residue

PMID:
31171207
DOI:
10.1016/j.talanta.2019.04.075
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center