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J Diabetes. 2019 Jun 6. doi: 10.1111/1753-0407.12960. [Epub ahead of print]

Association between birth weight and diabetes: Role of body mass index and lifestyle in later life.

Author information

1
Shanghai National Clinical Research Center for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Key Laboratory for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases of Ministry of Health of China, Shanghai Institute for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.
2
Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing, China.
3
The Affiliated Hospital of Southwest Medical University, Luzhou, China.
4
The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, China.
5
Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Hangzhou, China.
6
Affiliated Hospital of Guiyang Medical College, Guiyang, China.
7
Xinhua Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.
8
Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China.
9
Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China.
10
The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China.
11
The First Hospital of Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China.
12
Fujian Provincial Hospital, Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China.
13
Dalian Municipal Central Hospital, Dalian, China.
14
The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, China.
15
The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, China.
16
Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan, China.
17
Jiangxi Provincial People's Hospital Affiliated to Nanchang University, Nanchang, China.
18
The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, China.
19
Central Hospital of Shanghai Jiading District, Shanghai, China.
20
Jiangsu Province Hospital on Integration of Chinese and Western Medicine, Nanjing, China.
21
The First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei, China.
22
Karamay Municipal People's Hospital, Xinjiang, China.
23
The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China.
24
The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China.
25
Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China.
26
Shandong Provincial Hospital affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, China.
27
Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study investigated the association between birth weight and diabetes in a Chinese population, and the effects of body mass index (BMI) and lifestyle factors in later life on this association.

METHODS:

Data from 49 118 participants aged ≥40 years with recalled birth weight from the Risk Evaluation of cAncers in Chinese diabeTic Individuals: a lONgitudinal (REACTION) study, a nationwide population-based cohort, were used. Diabetes diagnosis was based on oral glucose tolerance tests and HbA1c measurements. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association of birth weight and risk of diabetes in later life.

RESULTS:

Increased risk of diabetes was associated with lower or higher birth weight. Compared with individuals with a birth weight of 2500 to 3499 g, the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of diabetes for individuals with a birth weight of <2500, between 3500 and 3999, and ≥4000 g were 1.28 (1.11-1.47), 1.11 (1.04-1.19), and 1.20 (1.07-1.34), respectively. Significant associations were prominent in participants with a current BMI ≥24 kg/m2 , but not detected in those with a normal BMI (OR 1.20 [95% CI 0.96-1.49], 1.11 [95% CI 0.98-1.25], and 1.10 [95% CI 0.89-1.37], respectively). Moreover, there was no increased risk of diabetes in individuals with a low birth weight but with healthy dietary habits (OR 0.94; 95% CI 0.68-1.29) or ideal physical activity (OR 1.41; 95% CI 0.97-2.04).

CONCLUSIONS:

A U-shaped association was observed between birth weight and the risk of diabetes. Healthy lifestyles (healthy dietary habits or ideal physical activity) may eliminate the negative effects of low birth weight in the development of diabetes, but not the effect of high birth weight.

KEYWORDS:

birth weight; body mass index; diabetes; lifestyle

PMID:
31170331
DOI:
10.1111/1753-0407.12960

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