Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Diabetes Obes Metab. 2019 Oct;21(10):2257-2266. doi: 10.1111/dom.13802. Epub 2019 Jun 30.

Type 2 diabetes remission 1 year after an intensive lifestyle intervention: A secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial.

Author information

1
Centre of Inflammation and Metabolism and Centre for Physical Activity Research, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
2
CopenRehab, Section of Social Medicine, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
3
Musculoskeletal Statistics Unit, Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
4
Research Unit of Rheumatology, Department of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
5
Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disease Translational Medicine Unit, Early Clinical Development, IMED Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Gothenburg, Sweden.
6
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Abstract

AIM:

To investigate whether an intensive lifestyle intervention induces partial or complete type 2 diabetes (T2D) remission.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

In a secondary analysis of a randomized, assessor-blinded, single-centre trial, people with non-insulin-dependent T2D (duration <10 years), were randomly assigned (2:1, stratified by sex, from April 2015 to August 2016) to a lifestyle intervention group (n = 64) or a standard care group (n = 34). The primary outcome was partial or complete T2D remission, defined as non-diabetic glycaemia with no glucose-lowering medication at the outcome assessments at both 12 and 24 months from baseline. All participants received standard care, with standardized, blinded, target-driven medical therapy during the initial 12 months. The lifestyle intervention included 5- to 6-weekly aerobic and combined aerobic and strength training sessions (30-60 minutes) and individual dietary plans aiming for body mass index ≤25 kg/m2 . No intervention was provided during the 12-month follow-up period.

RESULTS:

Of the 98 randomized participants, 93 completed follow-up (mean [SD] age 54.6 [8.9] years; 46 women [43%], mean [SD] baseline glycated haemoglobin 49.3 [9.3] mmol/mol). At follow-up, 23% of participants (n = 14) in the intervention and 7% (n = 2) in the standard care group met the criteria for any T2D remission (odds ratio [OR] 4.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.8-21.4]; P = 0.08). Assuming participants lost to follow-up (n = 5) had relapsed, the OR for T2D remission was 4.4 (95% CI 1.0-19.8; P = 0.048).

CONCLUSIONS:

The statistically nonsignificant threefold increased remission rate of T2D in the lifestyle intervention group calls for further large-scale studies to understand how to implement sustainable lifestyle interventions among people with T2D.

KEYWORDS:

clinical trial; dietary intervention; exercise intervention; type 2 diabetes; weight control

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center